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I use this code:

from __future__ import division
from __future__ import print_function

in_file = open("s:/Personal Folders/Andy/Python Projects/People Cancelled/Analyze Authorize Truncated.csv")
text = in_file.readlines()
in_file.close()

header = text[0:1]
text = text[1:]

for index, line in enumerate(text):
    text[index] = line.split(",")

name = text
dates = text

for index, line in enumerate(name):
    name[index] = line[3:5]

for stuff, area in enumerate(dates):
     dates[stuff] = area[7:8]

print(name)
print(dates)

And I get this output:

 [[], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]
 [[], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]

Any idea why? For some reason there seems to be some sort of interference between the two of the for loops - if I do either individually I get the results I want.

Thanks!

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Can you give us an example of your input data? –  Stephen Terry Sep 8 '11 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Look at these two lines:

name = text
date = text

These lines do not make copies of text for name and date to point to; rather, they set both name and date to be in essence alternate names for text. So, after the third for loop (with body name[index] = line[3:5], every line in text is two items long (because text and name are the same list). In fact, I don't even see why you set both name and date equal to text initially; the intended results could be achieved simply by making name and date equal to new, empty lists and appending items to them based on text.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, doh, that makes sense! I'll have to figure out how to append to a new list values from an old list but that shouldn't be too hard. Actually, I can also take a slice of text (i.e. text[:]) and it should work –  Andrew Alexander Sep 8 '11 at 20:33
    
Lists have a method append - seems like that should be perfect. Or, you could define new lists in terms of the old ones using list comprehensions, like name = [line[3:5] for line in text] –  azernik Sep 9 '11 at 2:09

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