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A quick question really.. Could someone explain why the first example would work, yet the second does not.

   $(function()
   {  
      $("#select_one").change(function() 
      {
         alert('efjwelf');
      });
   });

### Example 2

  $("#select_one").change(function() 
  {
     alert('efjwelf');
  });

Thanks in advance

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2  
I would really recommend reading the official documentation. There are tons of resources about this. api.jquery.com/ready –  pimvdb Sep 8 '11 at 20:49
3  
This is why I don't like the syntax $(function(). I much prefer the functionally equivalent $(document).ready() because it's much more self descriptive for people that aren't jQuery experts. –  jfriend00 Sep 8 '11 at 20:53
    
@jfriend00 — $ is a horrible function, its name is meaningless and it does completely different things depending on if you pass a string containing a CSS selector, an HTMLElementNode, a string containing HTML or a function. –  Quentin Sep 8 '11 at 20:55
1  
@jfriend - That is pretty much where i was going wrong. i didn't realise one was an alias of another. I was also struggling with describing the issue when searching around.. It seems so simple now lol. –  Lee Sep 8 '11 at 20:56
    
@Quentin - that's jQuery. You either learn it or use a different library. $ is heavily overloaded depending upon what you pass it. So are lots of jQuery functions. x.html() returns the innerHTML and x.html("foo") sets the innerHTML. YUI uses the more traditional x.getContent() and x.setContent("foo"). They are what they are. You either learn how it works and adapt or pick a library that suits your style. –  jfriend00 Sep 8 '11 at 21:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the second example, the element you are binding (#select_one) to does not exist yet, so the event listener doesn't get binded to anything.

When you call bind (or change, or other shortcut methods), the event listener only gets attached to the elements that the selector matches at that time. Elements added in the future do not get attached. To get around this, these methods are used:

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Because the #select_one object doesn't exist until the DOM is fully loaded. $function(){...}) is shorthand for $(document).ready(function() {...})

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On the second one, element that you are trying to attach an event handler is not available yet.

Check this: http://api.jquery.com/ready/

All three of the following syntaxes are equivalent:
$(document).ready(handler)
$().ready(handler) (this is not recommended)
$(handler)
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Thanks, a silly mistake.. Makes sense now :D.. –  Lee Sep 8 '11 at 20:57

It's a matter of when the DOM is ready/loaded.

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if element with id='select_one' exists at the time of execution of both scripts - they will both work.

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