Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The following returns True (because 2147483647 is a prime).

length [f | f <- [2..(floor(sqrt 2147483647))], 2147483647 `mod` f == 0 ] == 0

Why doesn't it work when I try to extend it as below?

Prelude> [n | n <- [2..], length [f | f <- [2..(floor(sqrt n))], n `mod` f == 0 ] == 0 ]

<interactive>:1:39:
    Ambiguous type variable `t' in the constraints:
      `RealFrac t' arising from a use of `floor' at <interactive>:1:39-51
      `Integral t' arising from a use of `mod' at <interactive>:1:56-64
      `Floating t' arising from a use of `sqrt' at <interactive>:1:45-50
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)

I don't understand though, why is a RealFrac arising from a use of floor? I thought floor took RealFracs and produced Integrals? Plus it didn't complain with the above example, I'm only inputting more integers as I did then.

Prelude> :t floor
floor :: (RealFrac a, Integral b) => a -> b
share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Let’s un-obfuscate this slightly:

Prelude> (\x -> x `mod` (floor . sqrt) x) 2

<interactive>:1:24:
    Ambiguous type variable `b' in the constraints:
      `Floating b' arising from a use of `sqrt' at <interactive>:1:24-27
      `Integral b' arising from a use of `mod' at <interactive>:1:7-30
      `RealFrac b' arising from a use of `floor' at <interactive>:1:16-20
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)

You’re using the value of n as a float, passing it to sqrt and floor. You’re then using that result as an int, passing that result to mod. The compiler can’t name a type with all those instances.

The reason it works in your first example, in other words

Prelude> 2 `mod` (floor . sqrt) 2
0

is because you’re using two different numeric literals. One can be an int and one can be a float. If you’re using the same value for both, you need to call fromIntegral to convert the int to a float.

You can get a different error message by adding a type signature, changing [2..] to [2..] :: [Integer]:

No instance for (RealFrac Integer)
  arising from a use of `floor' at <interactive>:1:52-64
No instance for (Floating Integer)
  arising from a use of `sqrt' at <interactive>:1:58-63

This might make it more clear that you’re using the value of n as two different types.

share|improve this answer

As pointed out by C. A. McCann below, my answer is not correct :-)

As far as I can see, it's because the list you produce can consist of any instance of Floating since the type signature of sqrt is

sqrt :: Floating a => a -> a

By precomposing sqrt with fromIntegral :: (Integral a, Num b) => a -> b, you get the desired result:

    Prelude> take 10 $ [n | n <- [2..], length [f | f <- [2..(floor(sqrt (fromIntegral n)))], n `mod` f == 0 ] == 0 ] 
[2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29]
share|improve this answer
2  
Haskell's type defaulting mechanism will generally handle that sort of ambiguity--just "any instance of Floating" will usually default to Double, for example. The error in the question is due to constraints that rule out all the possible choices of a default type. – C. A. McCann Sep 8 '11 at 21:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.