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I have a base class that has a method that gets executed by derived classes. The method is raised by a constructor of the derived class and by some methods or properties in it. I need to determine if that came from inside the instance constructor of that derived class or after that (in runtime).

The following example explains what I need:

public class Base
{
    public Base()
    {

    }

    protected void OnSomeAction(object sender)
    {
        // if from derived constructor EXIT, else CONTINUE
    }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public void Raise()
    {
        base.OnSomeAction(this); // YES if not called by constructor
    }

    public Derived()
    {
        base.OnSomeAction(this); // NO
        Raise(); // NO
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var c = new Derived(); // NO (twice)
        c.Raise(); // YES
    }
}

The problem is that I cannot change the signature or arguments because I cannot alter derived classes. Basically what I was thinking is to determine if the derived class (sender) is fully constructed.

So the implementation is as is. I cannot do changes in the base class that break derived classes. I can do changes only to the base class :/

Is this possible in some way, good or not? Even some reflection magic or similar hacky approach is unfortunately welcome as this is a must :/.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
The easy solution is: avoid setting properties in the constructor of any class; set the underlying variable (field) instead. –  Noldorin Sep 8 '11 at 21:07
    
what about auto properties? –  Piotr Auguscik Sep 8 '11 at 21:12
    
Noldorin that would work if I could change the derived clases. I cannot even see the source code :/ –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:14
    
Piotr, auto properties cannot call method from inside, however it doesnt matter if it came from a property or a method as long as it does not (originally) come from the constructor of the derived class. –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
Is this possible in some way...

Yes

good or not?

Not. But you already knew that. ;)

Nevertheless, here is one way to do it.

protected void OnSomeEvent( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    var trace = new StackTrace();
    var frames = trace.GetFrames();

    for ( int idx = 0; idx < frames.Length; idx++ )
    {
        MethodBase method;

        method = frames[idx].GetMethod();
        if ( method.ReflectedType == typeof(Derived) && method.IsConstructor )
        {
            return;
        }
    }
    /* Perform action */
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.reflection.methodbase.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
i changed the example in the meantime as the event was a bad example the proper example is just the call to the method, but your answer still holds water. I will check this now. Thanks! –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:23
    
This seems to work weel if I put: if (method.ReflectedType.IsSubclassOf(typeof(Base)) && method.IsConstructor) –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:32
    
Glad I could help. –  Paul Walls Sep 8 '11 at 21:39

Nice, clean, proper way - No! Im afraid not.

Hacky way which will no doubt lead to pain and suffering, Perhaps.

Put this insie your 'OnSomeEvent` handler:

var whoCalledMe = new StackTrace().GetFrame(1).GetMethod().Name;

will rad .ctor if called from the constructor, or Main when called from Raise method.

Live example: http://rextester.com/rundotnet?code=DBRLC84297

share|improve this answer
    
This would work only if called directly from the constructor right? –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:24
    
Yes, the GetFrame(1) part is a little strict, better to walk the stack looking for a ctor. –  Henk Holterman Sep 8 '11 at 21:37

I'm interpreting your (very severe!) constraints as saying you can't change method signatures and perhaps can't add instance fields, but you will allow code changes and static fields. If so, my approach involves setting a static "fromDerivedConstructor" variable and testing it as appropriate. (The variable is made thread-static in order for the code to be threadsafe. The below program prints

NO
NO
YES

as requested :-)

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication33 {
  public class Base {
    [ThreadStatic]
    protected static bool fromDerivedConstructor;

    public Base() {}

    protected void OnSomeAction(object sender) {
      // if from derived constructor EXIT, else CONTINUE
      if(fromDerivedConstructor) {
        Debug.WriteLine("NO");
        return;
      }
      Debug.WriteLine("YES");
    }
  }

  public class Derived : Base {
    public void Raise() {
      base.OnSomeAction(this); // YES if not called by constructor
    }

    public Derived() {
      fromDerivedConstructor=true;
      try {
        base.OnSomeAction(this); // NO
        Raise(); // NO
      } finally {
        fromDerivedConstructor=false;
      }
    }
  }

  internal class Program {
    private static void Main(string[] args) {
      var c=new Derived(); // NO (twice)
      c.Raise(); // YES
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately I may not have been clear at start, I updated my question. I'm not in control of derived classes. :/ –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:33

This is a weird problem, not being able to change the derived but can change the base? Eh?

Here's a very simple solution (I feel dirty):

public class Base
{
    private event EventHandler SomeEvent;
    private int initCount = 0;

    public Base()
    {
    }

    protected void OnSomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // if from derived constructor EXIT
        switch (initCount)
        {
            case 0:
                initCount += 1;
                Console.WriteLine("NO");
                return;
            case 1:
                initCount += 1;
                this.SomeEvent += new EventHandler(OnSomeEvent);
                Console.WriteLine("NO");
                return;
        }
        //  else CONTINUE
        Console.Write("YES");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes wierd requirement I completely agrre, but :( However looking at the code it seems that this would work for my specific example, but the order or count of calls may vary from derived class to other derived class... –  Marino Šimić Sep 8 '11 at 21:37
1  
hmmm that's a new requirement sneeking in there :) –  TheCodeKing Sep 8 '11 at 21:39

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