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The command object pattern is one that I still haven't been able to truly grasp and I found an implementation in the code I'm currently working on so I studied it long and hard to see if I could finally get it with a real world example. The problem is that I am sure this is not properly implemented and it is just an attempt by someone who just read about it and thought it made sense here.

Allow me to show it to you (for confidentiality reasons it will be greatly simplified but I'll do my best to show the main concepts):

public class CommandOne
{
   public CommandOne(Manager manager, MyForm form)
   {
      m_manager = manager;
      m_form = form;
   }

   public void Execute()
   {
       m_manager.CommandOne(m_form);
   }
}

public class CommandTwo
{
   public CommandTwo(Manager manager, MyForm form)
   {
      m_manager = manager;
      m_form = form;
   }

   public void Execute()
   {
       m_manager.CommandTwo(m_form);
   }
}

The first thing that strikes me as odd is that these two classes are not inheriting from any abstract class nor implementing a common interface.

The code that uses these commands is as follows:

public class MyForm : System.Windows.Forms.Form
{
   public MyForm(Manager manager)
   {
      m_manager = manager;
   }

   private void SomeMethod()
   {
      ....
      var cmd = new CommandOne(manager, this);
      cmd.Execute();
      ...
   }

   private void OtherMethod()
   {
      ....
      var cmd = new CommandTwo(manager, this);
      cmd.Execute();
      ...
   }
}

So the way I see it, this form is absolutely coupled to all the classes involved except the manager which is being injected to it through its constructors. So with this code I really don't see any benefit of creating the "command" classes which basically are just delegating the call to the manager's methods since the form is instantiating them when it needs them and calling the execute method right afterwards.

So could someone please explain what pieces, if any, is this implementation missing to truly be a command object pattern and, although it might be too subjective, what would be the benefit to implement it in this case?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
What are the commands using the Form for? –  SwDevMan81 Sep 8 '11 at 21:38
    
It is being sent to the delegated method in the manager which displays the message box asking the user if he wants to save or not his changes and modifies the form's properties accordingly. IMO this is really bad design but it is, I think, beyond the scope of the question :) –  Sergio Romero Sep 9 '11 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Based on what you're showing here it looks like the benefit of the command pattern is lost. There are a few reasons you might want to use the command pattern in the context of a WinForms app.

You want to execute a command later

public interface ICommand
{
    void Execute();
}

Keep a history of executed commands so they can be undone by the user

public interface ICommand
{
    void Execute();

    void Undo();
}

Check permissions to see if the current user has rights to execute the command. For example, maybe you have a RefundCustomerCommand and not all customer service agents have the right to issue a refund so you want to disable a button on the form.

public interface ICommand
{
    void Execute();

    bool CanExecute { get; }
}

You can also roll multiple commands together in a composite like this:

public class CompositeCommand : ICommand
{
    private readonly List<ICommand> commands;

    public CompositeCommand()
    {
        commands = new List<ICommand>();
    }

    public void Add(ICommand command)
    {
        commands.Add(command);
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        foreach (var command in commands) command.Execute();
    }
}

The command pattern also works nicely with the decorator. You can easily add additional cross-cutting behavior to your commands like retry logic:

public class RetryOnTimeout : ICommand
{
    private readonly ICommand command;
    private int numberOfRetries;

    public RetryOnTimeout(ICommand command, int numberOfRetries)
    {
        this.command = command;
        this.numberOfRetries = numberOfRetries;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        try
        {
            command.Execute();
        }
        catch (TimeoutException)
        {
            if (++numberOfRetries > 3)
                throw;

            Execute();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Michael. So from your answer, would it make sense if the form would still instantiate the manager (let's forget about dependency injection for now on the manager) injecting itself to it, create all the necessary commands in some kind of composite and then depending on the operation needed have the composite find the appropriate command return its interface so the form can just run its execute method? And a second question although it may be subjective, does all of this make sense or is it overkill? Would it be better to use another pattern? –  Sergio Romero Sep 9 '11 at 14:45
    
I'm not really following your scenario. If your solution is complicated, hopefully it's because the problem is complicated. The idea of finding the appropriate command and returning an interface is pretty common though. For example, a common solution to implementing a protocol like SMTP is to have an object that manages the socket and then dispatches to command objects based on the message (HeloCommand, MailFromCommand, RcptToCommand, etc...). The command objects can be looked up dynamically. –  Michael Valenty Sep 9 '11 at 16:27

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