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Given:

$val = "font-size:12px;color:#ff0000;font-family:Arial";

The following code will explode the string twice, to produce an array of arrays:

$val = explode(';',$val);
foreach($val as &$v)
    $v = explode(':',$v);

var_dump($val);

The output is:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(9) "font-size"
    [1]=>
    string(4) "12px"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(4) "fill"
    [1]=>
    string(7) "#ff0000"
  }
  [2]=>
  &array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(11) "font-family"
    [1]=>
    string(5) "Arial"
  }
}

Is there a more efficient / cleaner way to achieve the same result?

I'd prefer something with no lambda functions since PHP 5.2 doesn't support them. But this is a purely intellectual question anyway, so, that's just a preference.

share|improve this question
1  
It seems like array_map() would probably figure into an answer. – Jared Farrish Sep 8 '11 at 22:46
    
@Jared: I was thinking the exact same thing. But I'd prefer no lambda functions – Josh Sep 8 '11 at 22:48
    
Then shouldn't you include that in your question? – Jared Farrish Sep 8 '11 at 22:49
    
What about your current approach makes it feel inefficient/unclean? – salathe Sep 8 '11 at 22:52
    
@Jared: Yes, I should have :-) I have edited my question. – Josh Sep 8 '11 at 22:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try with:

$input  = "font-size:12px;color:#ff0000;font-family:Arial";

preg_match_all('/([^:]*?):([^;]*);?/', $input, $matches);

$output = array_combine($matches[1], $matches[2]);

Output:

array(3) {
  ["font-size"]=>
  string(4) "12px"
  ["color"]=>
  string(7) "#ff0000"
  ["font-family"]=>
  string(5) "Arial"
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't get the same output. I get array(3) { ["font-size"]=> string(0) "" ["12px;color"]=> string(0) "" ["#ff0000;font-family"]=> string(0) "" } – Josh Sep 8 '11 at 22:47
    
Sorry -- Edited – hsz Sep 9 '11 at 7:47

I'd recommend against references--you can run into some odd errors. But your approach is fine. Alternatively, you could do something with array_map:

$val = array_map(function($v) { return explode(':', $v); }, explode(';', $val)));
share|improve this answer
    
I'm very comfortable with references, so I'm not concerned there. My approach works fine, I just wanted something cooler. :-) Yours is nice although it requires PHP 5.3 – Josh Sep 8 '11 at 22:48
1  
"I'm very comfortable with references" -- that doesn't make them good to use :) – mfonda Sep 8 '11 at 22:50
    
No. As with anything, they're a tool. Just because I have references in my toolbox doesn't mean they're right for every application. But in the way I'm using them, the references won't produce any odd errors, so I see no reason to avoid them in this case given that I understand them well and know why I'm using them here. – Josh Sep 8 '11 at 22:55

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