Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My PATH environment variable right now is:

./subTmp:/usr/local/bin

How do I remove the ./subTmp part from it?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
That's a rather strange PATH; usually they include /bin and /usr/bin, at least. – Tom Zych Sep 9 '11 at 0:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The details vary a bit by installation and by local custom, but generally you have a file named either .profile, .login, or .bashrc in your home directory that contains a line something like

PATH = ./subTmp:/usr/local/bin

Just edit it to be whatever you need.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why on earth are you using an obscure term like that? Almost everyone who reads it will have to google it. – Tom Zych Sep 9 '11 at 0:06
    
An accepted group of traditions in Judaism en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minhag – Stedy Sep 9 '11 at 0:17
    
Sorry, I guess I forgot who I was talking to for a minute. Edited. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Sep 9 '11 at 0:34

If you want to remove it permanently, look for the file where it's set, which will have a name like .bashrc, .profile, or .bash_profile, in your home directory. For a temporary change, just use:

export PATH=(what you want in path)
share|improve this answer

this should do

export PATH=/usr/local/bin
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.