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With Scala's pattern matching I would like to confirm not only that two Strings are equal but for example, whether a String starts with, ends, or is contained in another etc.

I experimented with case classes and extractor objects, neither giving me a concise solution. So the solution I came up with looks like the following:

class StrMatches(private val str: Option[String]) {

  def ^(prefix: String) = str.exists(_.startsWith(prefix))

  def §(suffix: String) = str.exists(_.endsWith(suffix))

  def %(infix: String) = str.exists(_.contains(infix))

  def ~(approx: String) = str.exists(_.equalsIgnoreCase(approx))

  def /(regex: scala.util.matching.Regex) = str.collect({ case regex() => true }).isDefined

  def °(len: Int) = str.exists(_.length == len)

  def °°(len: (Int, Int)) = str.exists(a => a.length >= len._1 && a.length <= len._2)

  def `\\s*` = str.exists(_.trim.isEmpty)

  override def toString = str.mkString

}

object StrMatches {

  implicit def apply(x: Str) = new StrMatches(x)

  def unapply(x: StrMatches) = x.str

  implicit def unwrap(x: StrMatches) = x.toString

}

A client using the StrMatches class could look like the following:

object TestApp extends App {
  val str = "foobar"
  val strMatches = StrMatches(str)
  if (strMatches ^ "foo") {
    println(strMatches)
  }
  if (strMatches § "bar") {
    println(strMatches)
  }
  if (strMatches % "ob") {
    println(strMatches)
  }
}

As opposed to writing:

object TestApp extends App {
  val str: String = null // Just as an illustration for Scala interfacing Java.
  if (str != null) {
    if (str.startsWith("foo")) {
      println(str)
    }
    if (strMatches.endsWith("bar")) {
      println(str)
    }
    if (strMatches.contains("ob")) {
      println(strMatches)
    }
  }
}

With what kind of solutions would you come up with?

share|improve this question
1  
This is a very open-ended discussion. It is not really a question at all. This is probably better fielded on the IRC channel or Scala mailing lists at scala-lang.org/node/1707. –  Alain O'Dea Sep 9 '11 at 0:34
    
I get an error for the question mark final case class StrMatches (str: ?[Str]) { with Scala-2.9.0.1: "StrMatches.scala:1: error: not found: type ?" –  user unknown Sep 9 '11 at 2:12
    
@user unknown, Scala identifiers can be any collection of symbols. It might have been defined as: trait ?[A] –  Kipton Barros Sep 9 '11 at 3:22
1  
It isn't very clear to me, why you don't use a String, but an Option[String], and not an Option, but a ?[String], and not a String, but a Str. So there is confusion what you want to reach, and where the problem is. s.startsWith ("foo") is much longer than m ^ "foo", but I don't need a dictionary to know what m ^ "foo" means. My impression is, that Str, ?, Option ... isn't your point, and unnecessary ballast to understand the problem - maybe convenient, if the main problem is solved - which is, that you often have patterns, and like to perform multiple checks on the same pattern? –  user unknown Sep 9 '11 at 16:23
2  
Yes, I thought it is this way - my question is, what the open goal is, you want to reach? saving 4 keystrokes? Experimenting with funky names? Writing a DSL? –  user unknown Sep 9 '11 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could use regular expressions. Then you could use pattern matching (which I think was the original intent of your question):

object TestApp extends App {
    val str = "foobar"

    val StartsWithFooRE = """^foo.*""".r
    val EndsWithBarRE = """.*bar$""".r
    val ContainsBoRE = """.*bo.*""".r

    str match {
        case StartsWithFooRE() => println(str)
        case EndsWithBarRE() => println(str)
        case ContainsBoRE() => println(str)
        case _ =>
    }
}

To make this more convenient, you could define an object with factory methods to construct the regular expressions. However, due to how pattern matching works, you'll still have to define the expressions outside of the match:

import scala.util.matching.Regex

object RegexFactory {
    def startsWith(str: String) = new Regex("^%s.*" format str)
    def endsWith(str: String) = new Regex(".*%s$" format str)
    def contains(str: String) = new Regex(".*%s.*" format str)
}


object TestApp extends App {    
    val str = "foobar"

    import RegexFactory._

    val StartsWithFooRE = startsWith("foo")
    val EndsWithBarRE = endsWith("bar")
    val ContainsBoRE = contains("bo")

    str match {
        case StartsWithFooRE() => println(str)
        case EndsWithBarRE() => println(str)
        case ContainsBoRE() => println(str)
        case _ =>
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see now from the discussion on chat that this question is more about writing a DSL and less about pattern matching. Nonetheless, I learned a few things about Scala and Regex's in the process, so I'm leaving the answer up in case someone else finds it useful. –  Jim Hurne Sep 11 '11 at 8:17
    
I actually wanted to have the very basic string comparisons like startsWith, endsWith, contains etc. from java.lang.String to perform the work instead of building up a regex parse tree before even matching it. But the symbolic names given to each operator method should resemble the corresponding meta-characters of regex, like startsWith := ^, endsWith := § etc. –  Tim Friske Sep 11 '11 at 12:28

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