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I really struglled the whol night to figure this out.. but :(

in a form, the user inputs a word and I need to check if his input doesn't contain characters out of a preset table of characters:

abggwdḍefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ

So far I use a code I found in php.net:

$temp_s = mb_convert_encoding($post['word'],'UTF-16','UTF-8');
$temp_a = str_split($temp_s,4);
$temp_a_len = count($temp_a);

for($i=0; $i<$temp_a_len; $i++){
    $temp_a[$i] = mb_convert_encoding($temp_a[$i],'UTF-8','UTF-16');

    $pos = stripos( mb_strtolower($allowed),  mb_strtolower($temp_a[$i]) );
    if($pos === false){
        echo '- '. mb_strtolower($temp_a[$i]) .' -is not allowed in '.mb_strtolower($allowed);
        return false;
    } 
}

what I'm doing wrong? because the if I submit the character it outputs:

- ḍ -is not allowed in abggwdḌefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ

UPDATE Another thing is how to allow uppercase or lowercase versions of the $allowed characters list?

share|improve this question
1  
str_split($temp_s,4); ← I don't think that does what you think it does. You've converted the string to UTF-16 (why?) and now you're splitting it into 4-byte chunks. I'm guessing you're under the assumption that 1 chunk = 1 character, which isn't true: UTF-16 characters are usually 2 bytes, sometimes 4 bytes. –  Thanatos Sep 9 '11 at 3:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code you posted doesn't actually seem to give me any errors, but here is a shorter version. Maybe see if this does what you want.

$input = 'ḍwhat';

$allowed = mb_strtolower('ḍabggwdefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ');

foreach (preg_split('//u', $input) as $c) {
  if (mb_strlen($c) !== 0 && mb_strpos($allowed, mb_strtolower($c)) === FALSE) {
    echo '-' . $c . '- is not allowded in ' . $allowed;
    return false;
  }
}

The only thing I'd say is try out your original code with str_split($temp_s,2); instead, since 4 isn't always going to work and more UTF-16 stuff will be 2 bytes. Both will potentially break though.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Logan, thanx for your help: your code works so far! the regular expressions solved it :) what about adding a "space" to the allowed list: because there will be words containing empty spaces and this is okay as long as the space is not in the beginning or ending of the posted word. Thank you so much. –  numediaweb Sep 9 '11 at 9:24
    
I think adding a space to $allowed is fine. You'll have to check separately that the first char is not a space. –  loganfsmyth Sep 9 '11 at 11:33

As simple as:

$unwanted = 'abggwdḍefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ';
$badText  = 'Foo baṚ Baz';
$goodText = '345235';

if (preg_match_all("/[$unwanted]/u", $badText, $matches)) {
    echo "Bad text is bad, invalid characters: " . join(', ', $matches[0]) . PHP_EOL;
}

if (preg_match_all("/[$unwanted]/u", $goodText, $matches)) {
    echo "Good text is bad, invalid characters: " . join(', ', $matches[0]) . PHP_EOL;
}

Note that your source code needs to be saved in UTF-8 and the input needs to be UTF-8 as well.

I'm really questioning the use of a UTF-8 blacklist though, since there are hundreds of thousands of code points. Blacklisting parts of them seems like a useless uphill battle. If you disallowed "Ṛ", why would you accept "Ŗ" or any of other variants of "R"-like characters. Catching them all is rather futile. Think about implementing a whitelist instead. (That is, if I'm understanding what you're trying to do at all. It's not really clear.)

Note that characters could be decomposed, which would mean they won't match your expression. For example, ü can be the character ü (U+00FC) or ü (U+0075 U+0308, which is u followed by a combining ¨). You should normalize characters to NFC (Canonical Decomposition followed by Canonical Composition), which means that any form of ü will be normalized to U+00FC. In PHP you do this with:

$badText = Normalizer::normalize($badText, Normalizer::FORM_C);

The Normalizer class is not installed everywhere by default unfortunately.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx and sorry for being not so clear :( well, I need this for a dictionnary application built with wordpress for the berber language, and I want people to write only allowed characters Berber Latin alphabet this ones : abggwdḍefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ –  numediaweb Sep 9 '11 at 9:15
1  
In that case you can simply negate the regular expression: "/[^$allowed]/u" –  deceze Sep 9 '11 at 11:00
    
thanx decez, it is solved using Logan F. Smyth solution :) –  numediaweb Sep 9 '11 at 22:42

there was no problem in my eclipse

$allowed = 'ḍabggwdefkkwhḤƐxqijlmnurṚɣsṢctṬwyzẒ';
$temp_s = mb_convert_encoding('ḍ','UTF-16','UTF-8');
$temp_a = str_split($temp_s,4);
$temp_a_len = count($temp_a);

for($i=0; $i<$temp_a_len; $i++){
$temp_a[$i] = mb_convert_encoding($temp_a[$i],'UTF-8','UTF-16');

$pos = stripos( mb_strtolower($allowed),  mb_strtolower($temp_a[$i]) );
if($pos === false){
    echo '- '. mb_strtolower($temp_a[$i]) .' -is not allowed in '.mb_strtolower($allowed);

} 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx steve for testing my code mess! if you try to test if via a form post then it wouldn't work. –  numediaweb Sep 9 '11 at 9:29

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