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Is there a better way to write this JavaScript?

switch (l) {
    //A
    case '1-1-1':
    case '1-1-2':
    case '1-2-1':
    case '2-1-1':
    case '3-1-1':
        obj.result = 'A';
        break;
    //B
    case '1-2-2':
    case '1-2-3':
    case '2-2-2':
    case '2-2-3':
    case '3-2-2':
    case '3-3-1':
        obj.result = 'B';
        break;
    //C
    case '1-3-2':
    case '1-3-3':
    case '2-3-2':
    case '3-2-3':
        obj.result = 'C';
        break;
    //D
    case '3-3-2':
    case '3-3-3':
        obj.result = 'D';
        break;
    default:
        obj.result = 'AA';
        break;
}
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1  
Maybe a lookup table. –  Thilo Sep 9 '11 at 2:42
3  
You realize that '3-3-2' will never result in 'D' because it's captured by 'C' first, right? –  waiwai933 Sep 9 '11 at 2:43
1  
Encapsulate whatever the pattern is in a function. Or don't encode whatever this data is in a string. –  Matt Ball Sep 9 '11 at 2:44
    
Thanks for pointing out the 3-3-2 issue. –  dibs Sep 9 '11 at 2:49
1  
This belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Chris Pietschmann Sep 9 '11 at 2:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The lookup table, as mentioned by Thilo in the comments:

var lookup =
{
    '1-1-1': 'A',
    '1-1-2': 'A',
    '1-2-1': 'A',
    '2-1-1': 'A',
    '3-1-1': 'A',

    '1-2-2': 'B',
    '1-2-3': 'B',
    '2-2-2': 'B',
    '2-2-3': 'B',
    '3-2-2': 'B',
    '3-3-1': 'B',

    '1-3-2': 'C',
    '1-3-3': 'C',
    '2-3-2': 'C',
    '3-2-3': 'C',
    '3-3-2': 'C',

    '3-3-3': 'D'
};

and its usage:

obj.result = lookup[l] || 'AA';

I can't say this is really any better than the switch version.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant. That does look a lot more elegant. Thanks people! –  dibs Sep 9 '11 at 3:00
    
I am guessing this is faster than a switch though? –  dibs Sep 9 '11 at 3:03
    
Not necessarily. This will be constant time; I would assume that the switch is implemented similarly. –  Matt Ball Sep 9 '11 at 3:07

If you told us how you got those values, we might be able to come up with a more concise solution, but here's how you'd use a lookup table (generated kind of backwards):

var byResult={
    A: ['1-1-1', '1-1-2', /* ... */],
    B: ['1-2-2', '1-2-3', /* ... */],
    /* ... */
};
var byInput={};
for(var output in byResult) {
    if(!Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(byResult, output)) {
        continue;
    }
    var inputs=byResult[output];
    for(var i=0, l=inputs.length; i<l; i++) {
        var input=inputs[i];
        byInput[input]=output;
    }
}
function lookup(value) {
    if(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(byInput, value)) {
        return byInput[value];
    }else{
        return 'AA';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have three values that (for the switch) I concatenated together with hyphens in between. So essentially I am looking up three values to find another one. –  dibs Sep 9 '11 at 2:53
    
I meant how did you get the relation between the inputs and outputs? –  icktoofay Sep 9 '11 at 2:55
    
I'm translating an old site that used ajax and a mysql lookup table. However I am only allowed to use this one js file. So no db lookups. –  dibs Sep 9 '11 at 2:57

Encapsulate the number to letter processing in a function so that your main code doesn't need to know how the translation is done. Call it like this:

obj.result = getThing(l);

// or, given your comment that l is formed by concatenating three
// values you could do the concatenation in the function
obj.result = getThing(v1, v2, v3);

Then within getThing() you can use your existing switch statement, or the lookup table from Matt Ball's answer, or whatever other method you like. And you can change the method at any time with no impact on the code that calls the function.

function getThing(v1, v2, v3) {
   var l = v1 + "-" + v2 + "-" + v3;
   // use lookup, switch, whatever
   return "somecode";
}

Note: don't actually call your function "getThing"; replace "Thing" with something that describes whatever these letter codes really are.

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