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I'm working on a very, very, very simple library to provide some convenience functions for working with native JavaScript objects, ideally (eventually) in a jQuery-like manner.

I have a dead-simple function: crawlObject which I modified to use jQuery's each() instead of a for(var key in obj) loop.

function crawlObject(thisObj, onSuccess, doRecursion) {
    var stopCrawling = false;
    if (isFunction(onSuccess) && ($.isPlainObject(thisObj) || isArray(thisObj))) {
        $.each(thisObj, function(childKey, value) {
            var childObj = thisObj[childKey];
            if (false === stopCrawling) {
                stopCrawling = isTrue(onSuccess(childObj, childKey, thisObj, value));
            }
            if (false === stopCrawling && doRecursion) {
                stopCrawling = isTrue(crawlObject(childObj, onSuccess, doRecursion));
            }
        });
    }
    return stopCrawling;
}

This has the advantage of crawling both Array objects and "plain" JS objects without additional logic.

But.

If I pass a "plain" JS object which happens to have a property name of 'length', each() implodes like a dysfunctional phoenix. This might happen if I am recursing on a large object defining DOM elements, which might include a length property intended to indicate a character display length in the UI. A value of 200 here is disastrous: suddenly each() is iterating 0-199 on the value of the prop.

Before I invest in any further refactoring, has anyone stumbled on a solution to this problem?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

jQuery's documentation for jQuery.each() clearly states that if the object has a .length property, then it iterates by numeric index from 0 to length-1 (like you would expect for an array or array-like object).

If you have an object with a .length property and the things you want to iterate are not numeric indexes from 0 to length-1, then jQuery.each() will not do what you want and you should not be using it.

Here's the specific code for jQuery.each() from the jQuery source. You can see on the 2nd and 3rd lines of the function that if there's an object.length, isObj will be false and it's not going to treat is as an object later:

// args is for internal usage only
each: function( object, callback, args ) {
    var name, i = 0,
        length = object.length,
        isObj = length === undefined || jQuery.isFunction( object );

    if ( args ) {
        if ( isObj ) {
            for ( name in object ) {
                if ( callback.apply( object[ name ], args ) === false ) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for ( ; i < length; ) {
                if ( callback.apply( object[ i++ ], args ) === false ) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

    // A special, fast, case for the most common use of each
    } else {
        if ( isObj ) {
            for ( name in object ) {
                if ( callback.call( object[ name ], name, object[ name ] ) === false ) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for ( ; i < length; ) {
                if ( callback.call( object[ i ], i, object[ i++ ] ) === false ) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return object;
},
share|improve this answer
    
I'd beg to differ that the documentation is "clear": 'Arrays and array-like objects with a length property (such as a function's arguments object)' doesn't quite convey the full extent of the import of this design choice (on jQuery's part). This (to me) indicates some sort of prototype check in addition to a hasOwnProperty('length'). But, you're right. There it is. Still, I'm dealing with complex, arbitrary objects. Only a small fraction might have a 'length' property--I'm not averse to adding more conditional logic to handle the edge case, I'm just wondering if there's another way. –  Christopher Sep 9 '11 at 3:55
    
You can always look at the jQuery code for jQuery.each(). The relevant line is this: length = object.length, isObj = length === undefined || jQuery.isFunction( object );. You can clearly see that it's going to treat it as an object only if there's no .length. –  jfriend00 Sep 9 '11 at 4:07
    
there it is. Well, it is what it is. That answers the question, thanks. –  Christopher Sep 9 '11 at 4:16

i think if(thisObj.hasOwnProperty("length")) might do it for you

share|improve this answer
    
Traditionally, yes--that's the proper way to iterate loops. But in this case, it's jQuery's each that is the problem: in $.each({ name: 'My Thrifty Prop', length: 200}, function(key, value) { alert(key); } );, you'll get a series of alerts 0-199. Evaluating for $.isArray() and hasOwnProperty('length') is means of bypassing $.each(), but I don't think it solves the problem. Of course, this may not be solvable using $.each()--I'm just curious if there's a way to make it work. –  Christopher Sep 9 '11 at 3:41

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