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I am using matplotlib to create 2d line-plots. For the purposes of publication, I would like to have those plots in black and white (not grayscale), and I am struggling to find a non-intrusive solution for that.

Gnuplot automatically alters dashing patterns for different lines, is something similar possible with matplotlib?

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2 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Below I provide functions to convert a colored line to a black line with unique style. My quick test showed that after 7 lines, the colors repeated. If this is not the case (and I made a mistake), then a minor adjustment is needed for the "constant" COLORMAP in the provided routine.

Here's the routine and example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def setAxLinesBW(ax):
    """
    Take each Line2D in the axes, ax, and convert the line style to be 
    suitable for black and white viewing.
    """
    MARKERSIZE = 3

    COLORMAP = {
        'b': {'marker': None, 'dash': (None,None)},
        'g': {'marker': None, 'dash': [5,5]},
        'r': {'marker': None, 'dash': [5,3,1,3]},
        'c': {'marker': None, 'dash': [1,3]},
        'm': {'marker': None, 'dash': [5,2,5,2,5,10]},
        'y': {'marker': None, 'dash': [5,3,1,2,1,10]},
        'k': {'marker': 'o', 'dash': (None,None)} #[1,2,1,10]}
        }

    for line in ax.get_lines() + ax.get_legend().get_lines():
        origColor = line.get_color()
        line.set_color('black')
        line.set_dashes(COLORMAP[origColor]['dash'])
        line.set_marker(COLORMAP[origColor]['marker'])
        line.set_markersize(MARKERSIZE)

def setFigLinesBW(fig):
    """
    Take each axes in the figure, and for each line in the axes, make the
    line viewable in black and white.
    """
    for ax in fig.get_axes():
        setAxLinesBW(ax)

xval = np.arange(100)*.01

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(211)

ax.plot(xval,np.cos(2*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(3*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(4*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(5*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(6*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(7*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(8*np.pi*xval))

ax = fig.add_subplot(212)
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(2*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(3*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(4*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(5*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(6*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(7*np.pi*xval))
ax.plot(xval,np.cos(8*np.pi*xval))

fig.savefig("colorDemo.png")
setFigLinesBW(fig)
fig.savefig("bwDemo.png")

This provides the following two plots: First in color: enter image description here Then in black and white: enter image description here

You can adjust how each color is converted to a style. If you just want to only play with the dash style (-. vs. -- vs. whatever pattern you want), set the COLORMAP corresponding 'marker' value to None and adjusted the 'dash' pattern, or vice versa.

For example, the last color in the dictionary is 'k' (for black); originally I had only a dashed pattern [1,2,1,10], corresponding to one pixel shown, two not, one shown, 10 not, which is a dot-dot-space pattern. Then I commented that out, setting the dash to (None,None), a very formal way of saying solid line, and added the marker 'o', for circle.

I also set a 'constant' MARKERSIZE, which will set the size of each marker, because I found the default size to be a little large.

This obviously does not handle the case when your lines already have a dash or marker patter, but you can use these routines as a starting point to build a more sophisticated converter. For example if you original plot had a red solid line and a red dotted line, they both would turn into black dash-dot lines with these routines. Something to keep in mind when you use them.

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That was great, very useful, thanks! –  dividebyzero Mar 14 '12 at 21:53
3  
for line in ax.get_lines() + ax.get_legend().get_lines(): Change the loop to the above line to also change the legend. –  nulvinge Nov 26 '13 at 18:44
    
ax.get_legend() returns None in matplotlib 1.3.1 when there is no legend, which makes the example above fail for me. It is great after a quick fix, however, so thanks! –  Abraham D Flaxman Jun 9 at 23:45
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Things like plot(x,y,'k-.') will produce the black ('k') dot-dashed ('-.') line. Is that not what you a looking for?

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Nit really, I would have to set it for every plot and dataset by hand. –  eudoxos Sep 9 '11 at 17:04
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