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I would like to know that "Is there any Difference between Java Byte Code and .NET Byte Code? If there any difference,Shall i take Hexa Decimal Values of that java byte Code and .Net Byte Code.Because, Hexa Decimal is independent of Languages and it is universal specification.

My Actual Problem is :

We are developing a mobile application in j2me and java.Here i am using external finger print reader for reading/verifying finger print.We are using one java api for reading/verifying finger print.

I capture the finger template and raw image bytes .I convert the raw image bytes into hex form and stored in a separate text file.

Here we using a conversion tool (developed in .NET) that converts the hex form into image.With the help of that tool we are trying to get the image from that text file.But we cannot get the image correctly.

The .NET programmer says the java byte and .NET byte differ.Java byte ranges from -128 to 127.But .NET byte ranges from 0 to 255.So there is a problem.

But my assumption here is :The hex is independent of java & .net.It is Common to both.So,Instead of Storing byte code in text file,I plan to convert that byte code into hexadecimal format.So,our .NET conversion tool automatically convert this hexadecimal into Image.

I dont know, whether i am going on Correct path or not?

Please Guide me to Get out of this issue..

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1  
I think it should be made clear if you are asking if the data types of Java java.lang.byte and .NET System.Byte are interchangeable. Are you asking if you can deserialize data stored as byte by Java from .NET? –  Filburt Sep 9 '11 at 7:23
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What is it you actually want to do ? That will help people give an appropriate answer. BTW, data isn't usually stored as hex - it is stored as bytes; hex is just a convenience for devs etc. It is all just numbers (/bytes/bits) –  Marc Gravell Sep 9 '11 at 7:27
    
Also, why does .NET have “Byte Code” while Java only has “Byte code?” That makes me sad. :( –  Bombe Sep 9 '11 at 7:34
    
Please See my edited Question.It will give you more idea... –  Saravanan Sep 9 '11 at 7:37
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@Saravanan what you have described in your edit is not "bytecode" - that is a term with a very specific meaning, hence why the answers must seem confusing. –  Marc Gravell Sep 9 '11 at 8:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I capture the finger template and raw image bytes .I convert the raw image bytes into hex form and stored in a separate text file.

OK; note, storing as binary would have been easier (and more efficient), but that should work

Here we using a conversion tool (developed in .NET) that converts the hex form into image.With the help of that tool we are trying to get the image from that text file.But we cannot get the image correctly.

Rather than worrying about the image, the first thing to do is check where the problem is; there are two obvious scenarios:

  • you aren't reading the data back into the same bytes
  • you have the right bytes, but you can't get it to load as an image

First; figure out which of those it is, simply by storing some known data and attempting to read it back at the other end.

The .NET programmer says the java byte and .NET byte differ.Java byte ranges from -128 to 127.But .NET byte ranges from 0 to 255.So there is a problem.

That shouldn't be a problem for any well-written hex-encode. I would expect a single java byte to correctly write a single hex value between 00 and FF.

I dont know, whether i am going on Correct path or not?

Personally, I suspect you are misunderstanding the problem, which makes it likely that the solution is off the mark. If you want to make life easier, store as binary rather than text; but there is no inherent problem exchanging hex around. If I had to pack raw binary data into a text file, personally I'd probably go for base-64 rather than hex (it will be shorter), but either is fine.

As I mentioned above: first figure out whether the problem is in reading the bytes, vs processing the bytes into an image. I'm also making the assumption that the bytes here are an image format that both environments can process, and not (for example) a custom serialization format.

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Hexadecimal is just a way to represent numbers.

Java is compiled to bytecode and executed by a JVM. .NET is compiled to bytecode and executed by the CLR. The two formats are completely incompatible.

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Now someone with 10000 rep will come in and tell me how wrong I am. I can feel it! :p –  rickythefox Sep 9 '11 at 7:22
    
Actually this is corret. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 9 '11 at 7:30
    
Well not 10000 but 190 :( you are right in what you said 100% but they can be interchanged using third party tools and shoot me dead as I can not remember the name atm but I had a copy at LotusSPhere 2007 conference in San fran :) –  Java Ka Baby Sep 9 '11 at 7:32
    
I want that tool! :) –  rickythefox Sep 9 '11 at 7:33
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It turns out the OP wasn't trying to describe bytecode at all. –  Marc Gravell Sep 9 '11 at 8:23

Yes, Java byte code and .NET’s byte code are two different things that are not interchangeable. As to the second part of your question, I have no idea what you are talking about.

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Yes they are different while there are tools that can migrate from one to an other.
Search google fro java bytecode IL comparison . This one from same search

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