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When was the unordered_map concept built into g++?

Because the following code throws an error.

#include<iostream>
#include<unordered_map>
#include<stdio.h>

using namespace std;

std::unordered_map<std::int,int> mirror;

mirror['A'] = 'A';
mirror['B'] = '#';
mirror['E'] = 3;

int main(void)
{
    std::cout<<mirror['A'];
    std::cout<<mirror['B'];
    std::cout<<mirror['C'];
    return 0;
}

I am compiling the code as follows:

g++ -c hashexample.cpp
g++ -o result hashExample.o
./result

The error I got is this:

inavalid types int[char[ for aaray subscript

What is the fix for this?

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Apart from the solutions offered below you can consider changing your template from <int,int> to <char, int> as you are using only chars for providing the key. Just an observation/suggestion! –  another.anon.coward Sep 9 '11 at 9:19
    
that should not even compile because of the std::int, which is not valid C++. –  phresnel Sep 9 '11 at 9:20
1  
stdio.h has been deprecated in C++ since at least 13 years ago, and why are you not indenting your code? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 9 '11 at 9:24
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is your assignment. You cannot assign values to your map in this place. C++ is not a script language.
This program works fine on my machine with gcc4.6:

#include<iostream>
#include<unordered_map>

std::unordered_map<int,int> mirror;

int main() {
    mirror['A'] = 'A';
    mirror['B'] = '#';
    mirror['E'] = 3;

    std::cout<<mirror['A'];
    std::cout<<mirror['B'];
    std::cout<<mirror['C'];
}
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You can do it "in this way", just not "in this place"! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 9 '11 at 9:24
1  
@Tomalak: You are right "in this place" is better. –  mkaes Sep 9 '11 at 9:36
    
yeah, I saw that too. however I cannot put it in main. –  crazy_pants Dec 8 '12 at 7:56
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First, as mkaes points out, you cannot put assignments outside functions, so you have to put it in any, for example main.

As for unordered_map, for recent versions of gcc, if you don't want to go into C++11, you can use the TR1 version of unordered_map:

#include <tr1/unordered_map>

and the type std::tr1::unordered_map. You know, C++11 supersedes all this, but you will (at least in GCC) get this working.

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