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I am doing a custom CMS and I have built my base content class like this:

class Content
{
  public $title;
  public $description;
  public $id;

  static function save()
  {
    $q = "[INSERT THE DATA TO BASE CONTENT TABLE]";
  }
}

class Image extends Content
{
  public $location;
  public $thumbnail;

  public function save()
  {
     // I wanted to do a Content::save() here if I 
     //  declare Contents::save() as static
     $q = "[INSERT THE DATA TO THE IMAGE TABLE]";
  }
}

My problem is this I know that static function cannot use $this but I know that Content::save() needs to use it.

I want Image::save() to call Content::save() but I wanted them to be both named save() and be declared public and not static because I need $this.

Will the only solution be renaming Content::save() so I can use it within Image::save()?

Or is there a way of extending methods?

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2  
Content::save is not declared static in your sample. Are you sure you have posted everything right? –  J0HN Sep 9 '11 at 9:30
    
PHP supports calling something static, eventhough its not defined as static. As long as you dont use $this, all is fine. –  TJHeuvel Sep 9 '11 at 9:32
    
What is your actual question btw? Should Image call Content's save? –  TJHeuvel Sep 9 '11 at 9:34
    
@JOHN, the function as posted before is how I wanted it to look like, that is why I inserted a comment at Image::save(): if I declare Contents::save() as static –  Rolando Cruz Sep 9 '11 at 9:34
    
@TJHeuvel: I am sorry if I am not able to articulate what I want to do well, yes I want Image::save() to call Content::save() but I wanted both to be called save(). I want both to be public and not static because I need $this. Is that possible? –  Rolando Cruz Sep 9 '11 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use parent to get the upper class. Even though in the following sample you call it using parent::Save, you can still use $this in the parent class.

<?php

class A
{
    public function Save()
    {
        echo "A save";
    }
}


class B
    extends A
{
    public function Save()
    {
        echo "B save";
        parent::Save();
    }
}
$b = new B();
$b->Save();
?>
share|improve this answer
    
That looks just right. Thanks! Waiting for 1 minute to accept. Why do stackoverflow have this time restriction on accepting answers anyway? –  Rolando Cruz Sep 9 '11 at 9:41

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