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Is it possible to have static methods in Python so I can call them without initializing a class, like:

ClassName.StaticMethod ( )
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5  
You can use global functions instead. If you define a global function StaticMethod inside a file named LogWriter, and then you import LogWriter in another file, LogWriter.StaticMethod() is how you'd invoke that method from outside the file. StaticMethod() from inside the file. Both ways, looks like a static method invokation in Java. –  bobobobo Apr 9 '13 at 21:37
1  
You might also find @classmethod as helpfull –  Guy L Aug 31 '13 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 674 down vote accepted

Yep, using the staticmethod decorator

class MyClass(object):
    @staticmethod
    def the_static_method(x):
        print x

MyClass.the_static_method(2) # outputs 2

Note that some code might use the old method of defining a static method, using staticmethod as a function rather than a decorator. This should only be used if you have to support ancient versions of Python (2.2 and 2.3)

class MyClass(object):
    def the_static_method(x):
        print x
    the_static_method = staticmethod(the_static_method)

MyClass.the_static_method(2) # outputs 2

This is entirely identical to the first example (using @staticmethod), just not using the nice decorator syntax

Finally, use staticmethod sparingly! There are very few situations where static-methods are necessary in Python, and I've seen them used many times where a separate "top-level" function would have been clearer.


Docs:

A static method does not receive an implicit first argument. To declare a static method, use this idiom:

class C:
    @staticmethod
    def f(arg1, arg2, ...): ...

The @staticmethod form is a function decorator – see the description of function definitions in Function definitions for details.

It can be called either on the class (such as C.f()) or on an instance (such as C().f()). The instance is ignored except for its class.

Static methods in Python are similar to those found in Java or C++. For a more advanced concept, see classmethod().

For more information on static methods, consult the documentation on the standard type hierarchy in The standard type hierarchy.

New in version 2.2.

Changed in version 2.4: Function decorator syntax added.

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1  
@dbr: Can I call one static method from another? –  legesh Sep 6 '09 at 12:05
    
I came across the situation where I wanted to add a callable attribute to some test class (such that I can change the operation of the test class by simply changing the callable). By default, the callable becomes an unbound method, so it's necessary to use the staticmethod keyword. I'd be curious if you think there's a better way to deal with such a situation. Clearly, one could wrap it in a function, but that just adds an extra level of redirection. –  Henry Gomersall Jun 5 '13 at 10:03
    
@legesh. It is indeed possible to call a static method from another static method. If you have a static method called bar2 from class foo that you'd like to call in the method foo.bar(), just call foo.bar2() inside foo.bar. –  wegry Aug 2 '13 at 22:28
    
@legesh it's possible as wegry says, but if you need to do that, you should probably be using regular methods, or standalone functions.. –  dbr Aug 3 '13 at 4:16

I think that Steven is actually right. To answer the original question, then, in order to set up a class method, simply assume that the first argument is not going to be a calling instance, and then make sure that you only call the method from the class. For example:

class Dog:
    count = 0 # this is a class variable
    dogs = [] # this is a class variable

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name #self.name is an instance variable
        Dog.count += 1
        Dog.dogs.append(name)

    def bark(self, n): # this is an instance method
        print("{} says: {}".format(self.name, "woof! " * n))

    def rollCall(n): #this is implicitly a class method (see comments below)
        print("There are {} dogs.".format(Dog.count))
        if n >= len(Dog.dogs) or n < 0:
            print("They are:")
            for dog in Dog.dogs:
                print("  {}".format(dog))
        else:
            print("The dog indexed at {} is {}.".format(n, Dog.dogs[n]))

fido = Dog("Fido")
fido.bark(3)
Dog.rollCall(-1)
rex = Dog("Rex")
Dog.rollCall(0)

In this code, the "rollCall" method assumes that the first argument is not an instance (as it would be if it were called by an instance instead of a class). As long as "rollCall" is called from the class rather than an instance, the code will work fine. If we try to call "rollCall" from an instance, e.g.:

rex.rollCall(-1)

however, it would cause an exception to be raised because it would send two arguments: itself and -1, and "rollCall" is only defined to accept one argument.

Incidentally, rex.rollCall() would send the correct number of arguments, but would also cause an exception to be raised because now n would be representing a Dog instance (i.e., rex) when the function expects n to be numerical.

This is where the decoration comes in: If we precede the "rollCall" method with

@staticmethod

then, by explicitly stating that the method is static, we can even call it from an instance. Now,

rex.rollCall(-1)

would work. The insertion of @staticmethod before a method definition, then, stops an instance from sending itself as an argument.

You can verify this by trying the following code with and without the @staticmethod line commented out.

class Dog:
    count = 0 # this is a class variable
    dogs = [] # this is a class variable

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name #self.name is an instance variable
        Dog.count += 1
        Dog.dogs.append(name)

    def bark(self, n): # this is an instance method
        print("{} says: {}".format(self.name, "woof! " * n))

    @staticmethod
    def rollCall(n):
        print("There are {} dogs.".format(Dog.count))
        if n >= len(Dog.dogs) or n < 0:
            print("They are:")
            for dog in Dog.dogs:
                print("  {}".format(dog))
        else:
            print("The dog indexed at {} is {}.".format(n, Dog.dogs[n]))


fido = Dog("Fido")
fido.bark(3)
Dog.rollCall(-1)
rex = Dog("Rex")
Dog.rollCall(0)
rex.rollCall(-1)
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3  
Nice explanation... it really points out why @staticmethod is important and what the consequences of not using it are. And being able to use a static method from an instance (without python raising errors) is, IMHO, a huge benefit, so there is little point in not using this decorator. –  MestreLion May 2 '12 at 23:42
2  
this is a very nice explanation! I had not quite understood the need for the decorator before this –  pratikm May 24 '12 at 9:14
4  
The first example (calling by class without @staticmethod) doesn't work for me on Python 2.7. I get "TypeError: unbound method rollCall() must be called with Dog instance as first argument (got int instance instead)" –  tba Feb 21 '13 at 21:46
    
This does not work. Both Dog.rollCall(-1) and rex.rollCall(-1) return the same TypeError: unbound method rollCall() must be called with Dog instance as first argument (got int instance instead) –  Mittenchops Oct 14 '13 at 14:26
    
I just tested it in Python 3.3.2 and it worked exactly as described: an error only occurs when the @staticmethod line is commented out... –  richthepanda Nov 3 '13 at 2:41

Yes, check out the staticmethod decorator:

>>> class C:
...     @staticmethod
...     def hello():
...             print "Hello World"
...
>>> C.hello()
Hello World
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You don't really need to use the @staticmethod decorator. Just declaring a method (that doesn't expect the self parameter) and call it from the class. The decorator is only there in case you want to be able to call it from an instance as well (which was not what you wanted to do)

Mostly, you just use functions though...

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4  
Either this doesn't work, or it is not clear what you mean. I'll remove my downvote if a working example is posted. –  Eric Wilson Jun 9 '11 at 19:18
4  
Actually, I think he's right. It works for me using Python 3. –  hwiechers Dec 3 '11 at 13:00
1  
This doesn't work, although it would make sense that it should. Silly python... ;) –  weberc2 Oct 1 '12 at 3:17
1  
@senderle That's what he said. It works on the class. @@staticmethod is only if you want it work on an instance as well. –  hwiechers Nov 3 '12 at 10:04
2  
This does not work inside a class. Python will pass self as the first argument unless you tell it not to. (see: decorator) –  Navin Feb 9 '13 at 16:44

Aside from the particularities of how static method objects behave, there is a certain kind of beauty you can strike with them when it comes to organizing your module-level code.

# garden.py
def trim(a):
    pass

def strip(a):
    pass

def bunch(a, b):
    pass

def _foo(foo):
    pass

class powertools(object):
    """
    Provides much regarded gardening power tools.
    """
    @staticmethod
    def answer_to_the_ultimate_question_of_life_the_universe_and_everything():
        return 42

    @staticmethod
    def random():
        return 13

    @staticmethod
    def promise():
        return True

def _bar(baz, quux):
    pass

class _Dice(object):
    pass

class _6d(_Dice):
    pass

class _12d(_Dice):
    pass

class _Smarter:
    pass

class _MagicalPonies:
    pass

class _Samurai:
    pass

class Foo(_6d, _Samurai):
    pass

class Bar(_12d, _Smarter, _MagicalPonies):
    pass

# tests.py
import unittest
import garden

class GardenTests(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

class PowertoolsTests(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

class FooTests(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

class BarTests(unittest.TestCase):
    pass

# interactive.py
from garden import trim, bunch, Foo

f = trim(Foo())
bunch(f, Foo())

# my_garden.py
import garden
from garden import powertools

class _Cowboy(garden._Samurai):
    def hit():
        return powertools.promise() and powertools.random() or 0

class Foo(_Cowboy, garden.Foo):
    pass

It now becomes a bit more intuitive and self-documenting in which context certain components are meant to be used and it pans out ideally for naming distinct test cases as well as having a straightforward approach to how test modules map to actual modules under tests for purists.

I frequently find it viable to apply this approach to organizing a project's utility code. Quite often, people immediately rush and create a utils package and end up with 9 modules of which one has 120 LOC and the rest are two dozen LOC at best. I prefer to start with this and convert it to a package and create modules only for the beasts that truly deserve them:

# utils.py
class socket(object):
    @staticmethod
    def check_if_port_available(port):
        pass

    @staticmethod
    def get_free_port(port)
        pass

class image(object):
    @staticmethod
    def to_rgb(image):
        pass

    @staticmethod
    def to_cmyk(image):
        pass
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