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Im looking to implement a modular generic object factory in Java.

My code will comprise of three basic elements:

  1. A DataLoader, which will provide a generic Collection
  2. A factory, which, given an element T, returns an object of type U
  3. A class that ties the two together, and provides a Collection

The bit Im struggling with is that class 3 doesnt care about the type T. What does matter is that the factory and DataLoader use the same T - ie the raw data provided by the DataLoader should be usable by the builder to build the objects provided by the third class - but the third class doesnt care what that intermediate format is.

So how do I mandate that the generic type T is the same for 1 and 2 without that type being part of the specification of 3?

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have a look at my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/7327209/… . I asked something similar, maybe answer are useful. –  Heisenbug Sep 9 '11 at 10:26
    
Class 3 returns a collection of type U? –  Mister Smith Sep 9 '11 at 10:31
    
Yup. Essentially I have a generic loader, that grabs collections of raw data, a builder that takens an element of raw data and turns it into an element of processed data, and a third class that funnels data from the former to the latter. I dont want the third class to know about the form of the raw data, just that class that the supplier supplies is tye same as that which the processor consumes. Im wondering if the fact that the third class doesnt need to know about the intermediate form suggests that that should be hidden in one of the two other objects –  PaulJWilliams Sep 9 '11 at 10:34
    
You class 3 is basically doing the map operation known from functional programming. This has been already implemented in Java, for example in Guava (great library btw.). You just give it a Collection<T> and a function which translates from T to U and it will give you a Collection<U>. No need to implement it by yourself. –  Philipp Wendler Sep 9 '11 at 10:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option is to use a helper class with two type parameters to bind the data loader and factory together, and then wrap that helper in another class that doesn't care about the original data loader's type:

public class DataLoader<T> {
    ...
}

public class Factory<T, U> {
    ...
}

public class Binder<T, U> {
    public Binder(DataLoader<T> dataLoader, Factory<T, U> factory) {
        ...
    }
}

public class ClassNumber3<U> {
    public ClassNumber3(Binder<?, U> binder) {
        ...
    }
}

You could even hide the existence of Binder from outside code by giving ClassNumber3 a generic constructor:

public class ClassNumber3<U> {
    Binder<?, U> binder;
    public <T> ClassNumber3(DataLoader<T> dataLoader, Factory<T, U> factory) {
        binder = new Binder<T, U>(dataLoader, factory);
        ...
    }
}
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I think that will do it...and I think I can even make Binder an inner class of ClassNumber3. Time for some prototyping... –  PaulJWilliams Sep 9 '11 at 10:43
    
Excellent - worked a treat - and Binder indeed can live inside Class3, while being hiden from view. Thanks –  PaulJWilliams Sep 9 '11 at 11:17

Just use different formal parameter types for your three classes, and bind them as you need to when you use them.

Maybe Cannot convert from Node<E> to Node<E>? will help - it shows how you can use different formal type parameter for different classes and bind them later on.

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Something like this?

    public class ClassNumber3 {
        public <T> Collection<T> tieBoth(DataLoader<T> dl, Factory<T,U> fact){

        }
    }
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