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Im hoping this isnt too basic a question- I have looked at similar questions but cant seem to understand, so Im reaching out for help.

Im using a repository pattern that I want to make generic - here is what I have for the generic:

    static public IQueryable<T> Get(Func<IQueryable<T>> pred, uint page=0, uint pageSize=10)
    {
         return pred()
                .Skip((int)(page * pageSize))
                .Take((int)pageSize);
    }

So I want to call it, but get an "has invalid arguments" with whatever lambda I try.

If I declare a method that returns an IQueryable and pass it in as the first parameter, that works- no compile error. Im stumped.

Please help? what is the correct way to call this with a lambda? Or, if my generic is out of whack, how best to declare it? I assumed a Func that returns an IQueryable would be best...

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It would really help if you could show us some of the lambda expressions which have failed... – Jon Skeet Sep 9 '11 at 10:29
    
Where from generic type T shoudl come to get() method? Is it declared on a class level? – sll Sep 9 '11 at 10:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Typically, rather taking in a Func<IQueryable<T>>, you just take the IQueryable<T> and work with that directly.

static public IQueryable<T> Get<T>(IQueryable<T> source, uint page=0, uint pageSize=10) 
{ 
     return source 
            .Skip((int)(page * pageSize)) 
            .Take((int)pageSize); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, it appears I was an idiot (which I had predicted to myself) :-) – Joe Sep 10 '11 at 0:48
    
Well, it appears I was an idiot :-) Im kinda new to lambdas, so cant yet pick out mistakes. Since the query needed no parameters, I did not include "() =>" at the beginning of all my linq attempts. adding "() =>" made it all work. But I did learn that a delegate was not required as per Jim's comment - I have changed it to be just an IQueryable, and things look better now - thank you :-) – Joe Sep 10 '11 at 0:57

Get is missing the T generic

static public IQueryable<T> Get<T>(Func<IQueryable<T>> pred, uint page = 0, uint pageSize = 10)
        {
            return pred()
                   .Skip((int)(page * pageSize))
                   .Take((int)pageSize);
        }
share|improve this answer

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