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One could think of this case as follows: The application dynamically loads a module, or there is a list of functions from which the user chooses, etc. We have a mechanism for determining whether a certain type will successfully work with a function in that module. So now we want to call into that function. We need to force it to make the call. The function could take a concrete type, or a polymorphic one and it's the case below with just a type class constraint that I'm running into problems with it.

The following code results in the errors below. I think it could be resolved by specifying concrete types but I do not want to do that. The code is intended to work with any type that is an instance of the class. Specifying a concrete type defeats the purpose.

This is simulating one part of a program that does not know about the other and does not know the types of what it's dealing with. I have a separate mechanism that allows me to be sure that the types do match up properly, that the value sent in really is an instance of the type class. That's why in this case, I don't mind using unsafeCoerce. But basically I need a way to tell the compiler that I really do know it's ok and do it anyway even though it doesn't know enough to type check.

{-# LANGUAGE ExistentialQuantification, RankNTypes, TypeSynonymInstances #-}
module Main where

import Unsafe.Coerce

main = do
  --doTest1 $ Hider "blue"
  doTest2 $ Hider "blue"

doTest1 :: Hider -> IO ()
doTest1 hh@(Hider h) =
  test $ unsafeCoerce h

doTest2 :: Hider -> IO ()
doTest2 hh@(Hider h) =
  test2 hh

test :: HasString a => a -> IO ()
test x = print $ toString x

test2 :: Hider -> IO ()
test2 (Hider x) = print $ toString (unsafeCoerce x)

data Hider = forall a. Hider a

class HasString a where
  toString :: a -> String

instance HasString String where
  toString = id

Running doTest1

[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( Test.hs, Test.o )

Test.hs:12:3:
    Ambiguous type variable `a1' in the constraint:
      (HasString a1) arising from a use of `test'
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    In the expression: test
    In the expression: test $ unsafeCoerce h
    In an equation for `doTest1':
        doTest1 hh@(Hider h) = test $ unsafeCoerce h

Running doTest2

[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( Test.hs, Test.o )

Test.hs:12:3:
    Ambiguous type variable `a1' in the constraint:
      (HasString a1) arising from a use of `test'
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    In the expression: test
    In the expression: test $ unsafeCoerce h
    In an equation for `doTest1':
        doTest1 hh@(Hider h) = test $ unsafeCoerce h
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It appears the answer is: You can't. Thus, I'm going to start a new question asking how to do what I want to do and hope there is some way to do it different from the approach I was taking. –  taotree Sep 9 '11 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it could be resolved by specifying concrete types but I do not want to do that.

There's no way around it though with unsafeCoerce. In this particular case, the compiler can't infer the type of unsafeCoerce, because test is still to polymorphic. Even though there is just one instance of HasString, the type system won't use that fact to infer the type.

I don't have enough information about your particular application of this pattern, but I'm relatively sure that you need to rethink the way you use the type system in your program. But if you really want to do this, you might want to look into Data.Typeable instead of unsafeCoerce.

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And there wouldn't be just one instance of HasString necessarily in the real case. I'm not understanding what you're suggesting with Data.Typeable. –  taotree Sep 9 '11 at 14:19
    
Well, then it's theoretically impossible to simply infer the type of unsafeCoerce h to something concrete, right? ;) About Data.Typeable: I've never used it myself, but I understood it can help with dynamically casting, which appears to be what you want to do. –  Rhymoid Sep 9 '11 at 14:51
    
Agh, sorry; Data.Dynamic does dynamic typing, and it uses Typeable to do so. You might want to read up on it :) –  Rhymoid Sep 9 '11 at 15:04
    
Is the problem that dispatch for type classes is only done statically? So, that anywhere there is a type class call, it must be able to resolve to a concrete type at compile time in order to dispatch that call? Is there no way to have it dispatch at runtime depending on the type of the value? I don't think Data.Dynamic is going to help me since I think it only works with concrete types as well. –  taotree Sep 9 '11 at 17:43
1  
@taotree No, type class dispatch is done dynamically. However, there must be a statically known algorithm for computing which dynamic dispatch to do. In your code, you haven't given such an algorithm: you've asked the compiler to coerce your hidden type to some other unknown type, but not told it how to decide what that other unknown type should be. (Note that "HasString" is not a type -- it's a collection of types.) –  Daniel Wagner Sep 9 '11 at 18:12

Modify your data type slightly:

data Hider = forall a. HasString a => Hider a

Make it an instance of the type class in the obvious way:

instance HasString Hider where
    toString (Hider x) = toString x

Then this should work, without use of unsafeCoerce:

doTest3 :: Hider -> IO ()
doTest3 hh = print $ toString hh

This does mean that you can no longer place a value into a Hider if it doesn't implement HasString, but that's probably a good thing.

There's probably a name for this pattern, but I can't think what it is off the top of my head.

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Sorry, that won't work for me. This is an overly simplistic example. In the full one, anything might be put in Hider. –  taotree Sep 9 '11 at 14:15
1  
@taotree But then you are trying to coerce a non-HasString type to a HasString type -- which will inevitably cause problems (like segfaults) that Haskell was designed to avoid. The "unsafe" in "unsafeCoerce" really stands for "it's unsafe to use this without doing your own proof that this is safe", and you are saying that you have a proof that it is not safe. Don't do this. –  Daniel Wagner Sep 9 '11 at 18:15
    
Where did I say I have a proof that it is not safe? I thought I said I proved it is safe. –  taotree Sep 12 '11 at 6:41

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