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Here is my batch script to execute a java code-

@echo off
@setlocal

set JARS=log4j.jar;commons-logging-1.0.4.jar
set abc="JAVA_HOME\bin\java" -cp %JARS%; "C:\Documents and settings\Administrator\Desktop\Temp" Test

echo %abc%

%abc%

And i get this error-

The system cannot find the path specified.

I have copied the compiled class file in the same location. But to be on a safer side i've provided the path of the class file above. Am I going wrong somewhere?

share|improve this question
    
you still don't have your -cp set correctly, see my answer. the -cp argument is one string enclosed in quotes and no spaces after the ";". – jtahlborn Sep 9 '11 at 15:14

sorry, dont have much time, but dont you want the output of JAVA_HOME?

for that you would use % like:

set x="%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java"
share|improve this answer
    
The outcome is still the same. – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:04
@echo off
@setlocal

set command="%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java" -cp log4j.jar;commons-logging-1.0.4.jar;"C:\Documents and settings\Administrator\Desktop\Temp" Test

echo %command%

%command%
  1. cmd is a reserved word, you can't use it as a variable like that!
  2. System variables should be %'d to be substituted.
  3. Use double quotes for paths containing spaces.
  4. You can't give the path to a class to run a class. You have to just give the class name.
share|improve this answer
    
In addition, most Java newcomers set the value of JAVA_HOME all the way till inside the bin directory. DO NOT do that. – adarshr Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
    
Not done that. But its still not working! – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:14
    
@hari Can you show the output of %JAVA_HOME%and %command%? What do you mean not working? Does it still say The system cannot find the path specified.? – adarshr Sep 9 '11 at 12:17
    
yes I'm getting the same message. – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:17
    
I have updated the question. Please take a look. – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This worked for me

@echo off   
set JAVA_HOME="C:\Program Files\java\jre6"
set JARS=".;C:\Program Files\lib\log4j.jar;C:\Program Files\lib\commons-logging-1.1.1.jar;"
set runJava=%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java -cp %JARS% Test
%runJava%
share|improve this answer

for starters you need:

set cmd="%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java" -cp "log4j.jar;commons-logging-1.0.4.jar;C:\Documents and settings\Administrator\Desktop\Temp" Test

update:

showed how classname "Test" should be incorporated.

share|improve this answer
    
actually "Test" is the classname.Should i append it with " .class"? – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:06
    
@hari Yes append it with a .class – Brett Walker Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
    
It is still not working. Don't know for what reason! – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:14
    
@hari See my admended answer below – Brett Walker Sep 9 '11 at 12:18

This is an amalgamtaion of the above answers. All are correct is part.

@echo off

set runJava="%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java" -cp log4j.jar;commons-logging-1.0.4.jar "C:\Documents and settings\Administrator\Desktop\Temp\Test.class"

echo %runJava%

%runJava%
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, the outcome is still the same. – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:00
    
I have made a significant edit to the answer. Ignore the above comment. – Brett Walker Sep 9 '11 at 12:16
    
Tried what you suggested. I'm getting the same message!!I seriously don't know where I'm going wrong. – hari Sep 9 '11 at 12:21
    
I use the following for running jars "%_JAVACMD%" %RUNTIME_OPTS% -Djava.ext.dirs=%EXT_DIRS% -jar dist\some.jar %*% where EXT_DIRS contain a list of all required jars. Something like it might work for running a class – Brett Walker Sep 9 '11 at 12:23

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