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I have a file path, gotten from the __FILE__ macro, and I want to extract 2 pieces from it.

The format is: /some/path/to/a/file/AAA/xxx/BBB.cc. I want the AAA and BBB path. xxx is generally src, inc, tst, etc, and the file extension is generally .cc, but not guaranteed.

I know I can use string.find() or even splitting the string into an array on the / character, but neither seem efficient, given the number of searches that would be needed. I thought about sscanf and feel that is probably the best approach, however, I have not been able to define the format such that it will skip the majority of the beginning and get the pieces I need. How could I use sscanf to do this, or is there a better way?

Thanks for the help.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using strtok()? – Kusalananda Sep 9 '11 at 12:06
    
@KAK strtok is one of the most flawed c functions I'd avoid it whenever possible. – CodesInChaos Sep 13 '11 at 9:01
    
@CodeInChaos, why? – Kusalananda Sep 13 '11 at 9:33
    
@KAK The biggest flaw is that it uses a global variable to store the current position, which breaks encapsulation for any method that uses it. Also it's not guaranteed to be thread safe. And finally I think it's ugly that it mutates the input string, but that's just a stylistic preference of me. – CodesInChaos Sep 13 '11 at 9:40
    
@CodeInChaos, so use the thread-safe strtok_r() if you have it on your platform. – Kusalananda Sep 13 '11 at 10:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use rfind, so that you can start at the end and work backwards:

string s = "/some/path/to/a/file/AAA/xxx/BBB.cc";

unsigned int a = s.rfind('.');
unsigned int b = s.rfind('/');
string BBB = s.substr(b+1,a-b-1);

a = s.rfind('/',b-1);
b = s.rfind('/',a-1);  
string AAA = s.substr(b+1,a-b-1);
share|improve this answer
  1. Get it right
  2. If it's not fast enough, improve it

It's easier to just write this yourself than try to get sscanf to do it. Your code will be easier to understand and quite a bit faster (but, I doubt that will matter).

Just loop from the back of the string. When you find the first dot, remember that location, then extract BBB when you find the first slash. Remember where the second slash is, and extract AAA when you find the third one.

share|improve this answer
1  
This kind of thing is so commonly done so it's probably better to find a standard solution (like using strtok()) than to code it yourself, and possibly get it subtly wrong. It's not with it. – Kusalananda Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
1  
Besides strtok being not such a beautiful function (needs to destroy the source string - so if you have a string literal you need to copy it elsewhere- and is non-reentrant), it works fine for scanning from left to right, but if I understand correctly he needs to scan from right to left. – Matteo Italia Sep 9 '11 at 12:40

A regular expression can do the trick:

#include <boost/regex.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main() {
    std::string path("/some/path/to/a/file/AAA/xxx/BBB.cc");

    boost::regex path_re(".+/([^/]+)/[^/]+/([^.]+)\\.(.+?)", boost::regex::perl);
    boost::smatch m;
    if(regex_match(path, m, path_re)) {
        std::cout << "part 1 " << m[1] << '\n';
        std::cout << "part 2 " << m[2] << '\n';
        std::cout << "part 3 " << m[3] << '\n';
    }
    else {
        abort();
    }
}

Output:

part 1 AAA
part 2 BBB
part 3 cc

Note, that it doesn't handle non-canonical paths with /./ elements in it.

share|improve this answer
char *path = ... /* fill this however you like, for example function argument */
char *AAA_start, *AAA_end;
char *BBB_start, *BBB_end;
        // go the end of the string and find the first .
for (BBB_end = path+strlen(path); *BBB_end != '.'; --BBB_end);
        // continue to find the first /
for (BBB_start = BBB_end; *BBB_start != '/'; --BBB_start);
        // Now you have the beginning and end of BBB
        // continue from there to find next /
for (AAA_end = BBB_start-1; *AAA_end != '/'; --AAA_end);
        // continue from there to find next /
for (AAA_start = AAA_end-1; *AAA_start != '/'; --AAA_start);
        // Now you have the beginning and end of AAA

        // Now you can do whatever you want with AAA and BBB, for example
char *AAA = new char[AAA_end-AAA_start+2];  // AAA_end is included in the result
                                            // hence +1. Another +1 for the NULL
char *BBB = new char[BBB_end-BBB_start+2];
memcpy(AAA, AAA_start, AAA_end-AAA_start+1);
memcpy(BBB, BBB_start, BBB_end-BBB_start+1);
AAA[AAA_end-AAA_start+1] = NULL;
BBB[BBB_end-BBB_start+1] = NULL;

That was the basic idea. Now you need to add error checking to this:

char *path = ... /* fill this however you like, for example function argument */
char *AAA_start, *AAA_end;
char *BBB_start, *BBB_end;
for (BBB_end = path+strlen(path); *BBB_end != '.' && BBB_end != path; --BBB_end);
if (BBB_end == path) return FAIL;
for (BBB_start = BBB_end; *BBB_start != '/' && BBB_start != path; --BBB_start);
if (BBB_start == path) return FAIL;
for (AAA_end = BBB_start-1; *AAA_end != '/' && AAA_end != path; --AAA_end);
if (AAA_end == path) return FAIL;
for (AAA_start = AAA_end-1; *AAA_start != '/' && AAA_start != path; --AAA_start);
if (AAA_start == path && *AAA_start != '/') return FAIL;

char *AAA = new char[AAA_end-AAA_start+2];
char *BBB = new char[BBB_end-BBB_start+2];
memcpy(AAA, AAA_start, AAA_end-AAA_start+1);
memcpy(BBB, BBB_start, BBB_end-BBB_start+1);
AAA[AAA_end-AAA_start+1] = NULL;
BBB[BBB_end-BBB_start+1] = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
If path doesn't have the right format, this code will read beyond the beginning of the string and thus exhibit undefined behavior. A bit more robustness would be nice. – CodesInChaos Sep 13 '11 at 8:51
    
@CodeInChaos, I didn't want the code to be bloated by error checking so the OP wouldn't miss the point. I will update the answer however either way. – Shahbaz Sep 13 '11 at 12:17
    
Posting non production ready code is fine IMO. But then the answer should point out the flaws, so that the user knows what he should change instead of just copy-pasting. Personally I'd implement a helper function similar to rfind since this code is a bit hard to read. – CodesInChaos Sep 13 '11 at 12:33

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