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Is it correct to write a function that returns char *?

Something like this:

char * func()
{  
 char *c = new char[3];
 strcpy(c, "hi");
 c[2] = '\0';
 return c;
}

int main()
{
 char *c;
 c = func();
 //code using c
 delete [] c;
 return 1;
}

It works, but is it correct?

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3  
correct in what sense? –  Alexander Ivanov Sep 9 '11 at 12:10
    
@Alecs you haven't used strlen function properly –  Pradeep Sep 9 '11 at 12:11
    
will the data in memory that was allocated in local function remains untouched when we will out of local function? –  Alecs Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
    
No, because the code won't compile... –  quasiverse Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
3  
As an aside, the c[2] = '\0'; is unnecessary, strcpy already does that. –  paxdiablo Sep 9 '11 at 12:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is correct (assuming you meant strcpy and not strlen), but it must be very clear from the documentation of the function that it's the caller's responsibility to free the returned pointer, and what method does it have to use to free it (new => delete, new [] => delete[], malloc => free, etc). That is the "C way" of doing it.

This relies on users of your function (including you after several months you wrote it) to read the documentation to get things right, so it's quite error prone; also, in C++ there are several more complications that are not present in C (namely: exceptions) that make using raw pointers in these contexts not such a good idea.

That's the reason why you normally should return classes that encapsulate resources (e.g. std::string in this case, and in general containers that manage the memory automatically) or ownership-transferring smart pointers, that also have the advantage of being exception-safe (which your code is not).

This sounds extremely complicated, but in fact it's not:

#include <string>

std::string func()
{  
   return "hi"; // actually, to be more explicit it should be return std::string("hi")
}

int main()
{
    std::string c;
    c=func();
    return 1;
}

That's it, no need to worry about allocations/deallocations and exceptions, all this is automatically handled by the std::string class, so you can manage strings almost as they were builtin types.

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1  
And free it with delete[], not free. –  paxdiablo Sep 9 '11 at 12:12
    
I think if he's asking a question like this, he's not really worried about documentation and encapsulations and smart pointers and exceptions and things like that. –  quasiverse Sep 9 '11 at 12:14
    
@paxdiablo: I expanded the answer. –  Matteo Italia Sep 9 '11 at 12:14
2  
Yes, and that's exactly why Matteo Italia mentioned these things. –  René Nyffenegger Sep 9 '11 at 12:16
1  
@quasiverse: using smart pointers and STL containers makes programming in C++ easier even for beginners; also, I think that newbies must be taught RAII from the beginning, it's fundamental for writing correct C++ code. –  Matteo Italia Sep 9 '11 at 12:16

Well, that works. The memory is allocated on the heap and is deallocated correctly. There is no need to manually add a null-terminator since strcpy does so.

But it's not really C++. In C++ you would use std::string.

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It works, but is it correct?

Your code is correct.

However, it depends on the context, if it's a good programming practice or not. For this minimal program you posted, I will prefer not to use new[] and delete[]. But would rather rely on std::string.

Demo.

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Your code is technically correct. However, I think most SO-ers here have reservations on whether it's considered "good" code or not.

For starters:

  • Pick meaningful variable/function names. c and func are not very descriptive and make it difficult for others to understand what you're trying to do
  • Generally you should have a corresponding function which cleans up any resources that your function has allocated.
  • Prefer strncpy() over strcpy() to prevent unexpected buffer overflows (or look into the String class)
share|improve this answer
    
1) I know, I decided that for such small example the short names are better 2) in this case how can I write function that will clean up? 3) in my real program I use strncpy, that's why I automatically added the '\0' char manually –  Alecs Sep 9 '11 at 12:27
    
Sadly, strncpy is not the counted version of strcpy, but it's a function thought for fixed-size buffers; it adds useless NUL padding when the string to be copied is shorter than the buffer but doesn't NUL terminate it when it's longer. I think that the best standard counted alternative to strcpy is *target=0; strncat(target, source, size);. –  Matteo Italia Sep 9 '11 at 12:31

try:

char * func()
{  
 char * c = new char[3];
 strcpy(c,"hi");
 return c;
}

int main()
{
 char *c;
 c = func();
 //code using c
 delete [] c;
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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