Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class (with properties and some methods)

[DataContract]
public partial class AbstractApplicationCallDto
{
    [IgnoreDataMember]
    private Exception exception;

    [DataMember]
    private string exceptionString;

    [DataMember]
    private string sessionId = null;

    [DataMember]
    private MyType myType = null;
}

When I add IgnoreDataMember to the field with the type Exception, I can generate the code for the client without problems. But if add DataMember, nothing is generated.

So why? How it is possible to add the type Exception to the DataContract?

share|improve this question
    
Please explain more clearly the problem when you mark your exception field as a [DataMember]. Exception is serialisable so it should work. –  Ben Robinson Sep 9 '11 at 13:59
    
@Mark exception is marked as serialisable. A non .net client could use it just fine for many different things e.g. reading the error message and stack trace. –  Ben Robinson Sep 9 '11 at 14:01
    
Though I'd recommend catching the exception(s) at the service and throwing a custom soap fault (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733721.aspx). Doesn't sound like a good idea, to serialize and return the actual exception that occured. Security wise that is. Client might learn a bit too much about your actual implementation. –  Christophe Geers Sep 9 '11 at 14:04
    
@Ben Exception is serializable, but many of the classes that inherit from Exception are not. You can run into issues if it is set to one of these child types. You have to be very careful when attempting to return an Exception. –  cadrell0 Sep 9 '11 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

This isn't really an answer, just some notes about Exception serialization, and I wanted the extra space for some code...

Have you thought about using FaultContracts instead? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733721.aspx

Although the Exception type is serializable, often whatever is set in its _data field is not serializable, and will sometimes cause a serialization issue. See here. A workaround for this is to set the _data field to null before serializing:

        Exception ex = error;
        FieldInfo fieldInfo = typeof(Exception).GetField("_data", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        while (ex != null)
        {
            fieldInfo.SetValue(ex, null);
            ex = ex.InnerException;
        }

Another issue is that by adding an Exception type to the DataContract, you are only covering the case for an actual Exception instance:

AbstractApplicationCallDto.Exception = new Exception();

However any derivatives of Exception would not work, for example:

AbstractApplicationCallDto.Exception = new NullReferenceException();

To make that work you would have to add a [KnownType] attribute to your data contract, so you would end up with something like:

[DataContract]
[KnownType(typeof(NullReferenceException))]
[KnownType(typeof(InvalidOperationException))]
[KnownType(typeof(ApplicationException))]
[KnownType(typeof(...))] // add one for every type of exception you might need to serialize back, or that might be contained in Exception.InnerException
public partial class AbstractApplicationCallDto
{
    ...

Back to your original question though, I can't think of a reason why the client generation tool would fail to generate anything when there is an Exception type in the contract... Does it give an error? Does it generate any code?

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer - your last line should really be the first though. –  Jeff Sep 9 '11 at 14:48
    
Good point. It was just the last thing I thought of. I'll edit and move it to the top... –  CodingWithSpike Sep 9 '11 at 14:51
    
Some code is generated, for example the AbstractApplicationCallDto, MyType and a class Exception, but the service interface code is missing. thanks @ rally25rs, i will try your solution –  Pippl Sep 12 '11 at 6:44
    
@Pippl - Can you add the code for your service interface? Since it isn't in your original question, it is hard to say why it might not be getting generated. –  CodingWithSpike Sep 12 '11 at 15:37

I had this problem also; I was able to get around it by making the field type ExceptionDetail and using it to wrap the Exception object. Example:

[DataContract]
public class WebServiceFault
{
    public WebServiceFault(Exception ex)
    {
        Message = ex.Message;
        InnerException = new ExceptionDetail(ex);
    }

    [DataMember]
    public string Message
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    [DataMember]
    public ExceptionDetail InnerException
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please show some example code showing how you did this. –  John Saunders Jul 29 '13 at 1:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.