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I have the following use case, Have a requirement for 30 Users working on one project(component) which may used by different team at various level. I want to maintain release branch or release repo stable at any level. What could be the best way to handle this. Two repo Like stable and one cloned from it called development where user clone and push the changes there and stable will go back to stable repo.

Stable repo < -- > Development Repo < -- > User repo

Or

Have two branch in single repo one as stable release and another as development where users push their changes.

Which is best ?

If it is branch model is it possible for other team to clone only that branch and not the entire repo. I don’t want them to do checkout to particular branch because in turn they may have developer clone from their repo.

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Hmm, I'm wondering the reason for the close vote. Please? – jweyrich Sep 9 '11 at 14:21
    
What that mean please.. – maestromani Sep 9 '11 at 14:30
    
It can be argued that a question like “which is best?” is always subjective and can not really be answered so that close vote is not entirely unjustified. – Bombe Sep 9 '11 at 14:51

I use the model from Vincent Driessen. It’s very easy to use and should enable you to do exactly what you want: a branch where all developers are working on, and a branch that holds the latest, stable release.

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That's a truly good model! – jweyrich Sep 9 '11 at 14:19
    
Thanks a lot will go through that, one question if i have answer in Vincent's they i will find. If it is branch model is it possible for other team to clone only that branch and not the entire repo. I don’t want them to do checkout to particular branch because in turn they may have developer clone from their repo. – maestromani Sep 9 '11 at 14:30
1  
Git only lets you clone complete repositories, and there’s no harm anybody else can do with that: you decide what you merge into your own repository, and if you’re in charge of maintaining the official repository, well, then you decide what’s going in there, too. – Bombe Sep 9 '11 at 14:50

Prefer repos over branches to do staged branching and create a hard tag when you pull changes in to the Stable Repo.

Other than that you don't need to create branches to show where the the stable version is in git. If the users use both the development repo and the stable repo as remotes (ofcourse keeping the stable repo read-only), then they can easily check in the logs where the refs are for both repos.

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That sounds like completely ignoring all the wonderful things your version control system can do for you. – Bombe Sep 9 '11 at 17:19
    
Not really. Cloning is conceptually a branch as well because it is a divergence of the code base. The goal is to make version-control less confusing for all users, so why create topic branches that needs to be synced when the repos themselves are branches? – Spoike Sep 10 '11 at 12:38
    
Now you sound like you are seriously confused as to what clones are, and what branches are. Branching is not diverting from any code base, cloning is not branching, and you can not sync single branches with Git. Sorry, I find it hard to make any sense out of what you are trying to say. – Bombe Sep 10 '11 at 15:17
    
@Bombe: There are many official definitions of branches, which makes it all confusing, so I'm sorry if I was. Software configuration management defines "branches" in a generic manner as divergence of code, or more commonly distinct copies of code. This means that in the example of git the following is a branch in generic sense: topic branches, cloned repositories, stashing etc. Hope this clears things up as I was only advocating the KISS principle. – Spoike Sep 12 '11 at 6:59

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