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( This is a simplified version of my original question )

I have several threads that write to a boost asio socket. This seems to work very well, with no problems.

The documentation says a shared socket is not thread safe( here, way down at the bottom ) so I am wondering if I should protect the socket with mutex, or something.

This question insists that protection is necessary, but gives no advice on how to do so.

All the answers to my original question also insisted that what I was doing dangerous, and most urged me to replace my writes with async_writes or even more complicated things. However, I am reluctant to do this, since it would complicate code that is already working and none of the answerers convinced me they knew what they ware talking about - they seemed to have read the same documentation as I and were guessing, just as I was.

So, I wrote a simple program to stress test writing to a shared socket from two threads.

Here is the server, which simply writes out whatever it receives from the client

int main()
{
    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

    tcp::acceptor acceptor(io_service, tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), 3001));

    tcp::socket socket(io_service);
    acceptor.accept(socket);

    for (;;)
    {
        char mybuffer[1256];
        int len = socket.read_some(boost::asio::buffer(mybuffer,1256));
        mybuffer[len] = '\0';
        std::cout << mybuffer;
        std::cout.flush();

    }

  return 0;
}

Here is the client, which creates two threads that write to a shared socket as fast as they can

boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket * psocket;

void speaker1()
{
    string msg("speaker1: hello, server, how are you running?\n");
    for( int k = 0; k < 1000; k++ ) {
        boost::asio::write(
            *psocket,boost::asio::buffer(msg,msg.length()));
    }

}
void speaker2()
{
    string msg("speaker2: hello, server, how are you running?\n");
    for( int k = 0; k < 1000; k++ ) {
        boost::asio::write(
            *psocket,boost::asio::buffer(msg,msg.length()));
    }

}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

  // connect to server

    tcp::resolver resolver(io_service);
    tcp::resolver::query query("localhost", "3001");
    tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_iterator = resolver.resolve(query);
    tcp::resolver::iterator end;
    psocket = new tcp::socket(io_service);
    boost::system::error_code error = boost::asio::error::host_not_found;
    while (error && endpoint_iterator != end)
    {
        psocket->close();
        psocket->connect(*endpoint_iterator++, error);
    }


    boost::thread t1( speaker1 );
    boost::thread t2( speaker2 );

    Sleep(50000);

}

This works! Perfectly, as far as I can tell. The client does not crash. The messages arrive at the server without garbles. They usually arrive alternately, one from each thread. Sometimes one thread get two or three messages in before the other, but I do not think this is a problem so long as there are no garbles and all the messages arrive.

My conclusion: the socket may not be thread safe in some theoretical sense, but it is so hard to make it fail that I am not going to worry about it.

share|improve this question
1  
There is little to no value in using io_service::post() with a handler that invokes write(). You are overcomplicating this, use async_write(). –  Sam Miller Sep 9 '11 at 23:51
    
Your implementation does not make sense from ASIO perspective. There is no need to asio in that code style. –  Etherealone Aug 14 '12 at 20:17

7 Answers 7

Use a boost::asio::io_service::strand for asynchronous handlers that are not thread safe.

A strand is defined as a strictly sequential invocation of event handlers (i.e. no concurrent invocation). Use of strands allows execution of code in a multithreaded program without the need for explicit locking (e.g. using mutexes).

The timer tutorial is probably the easiest way to wrap your head around strands.

share|improve this answer
    
A strand looks like a very interesting and useful beastie. However, at first glance it does not seem helpful in my particular case. The writes to the socket are not controlled by the same io_service, but occur as the result of a completely independant process. ( +1 vote for usefulness, on other occasions. ( –  ravenspoint Sep 9 '11 at 16:10
    
@ravenspoint a single socket is serviced by a single I/O service, it takes a reference in the constructor. If you use multiple io_service objects, that is an entirely different problem. –  Sam Miller Sep 9 '11 at 16:19
    
I do not understand your previous comment. I have edited my question to clarify, I hope, what I need to do. –  ravenspoint Sep 9 '11 at 16:44
    
@ravenspoint you are mixing asynchronous methods with synchronous methods. Don't do that. A strand is only useful in an asynchronous context. –  Sam Miller Sep 9 '11 at 16:47

It sounds like this question boils down to:

what happens when async_write_some() is called simultaneously on a single socket from two different threads

I believe this is exactly the operation that's not thread safe. The order those buffers will go out on the wire is undefined, and they may even be interleaved. Especially if you use the convenience function async_write(), since it's implemented as a series of calls to async_write_some() underneath, until the whole buffer has been sent. In this case each fragment that's sent from the two threads may be interleaved randomly.

The only way to protect you from hitting this case is to build your program to avoid situations like this.

One way to do that is by writing an application layer send buffer which a single thread is responsible for pushing onto the socket. That way you could protect the send buffer itself only. Keep in mind though that a simple std::vector won't work, since adding bytes to the end may end up re-allocating it, possibly while there is an outstanding async_write_some() referencing it. Instead, it's probably a good idea to use a linked list of buffers, and make use of the scatter/gather feature of asio.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not using aysnc_write_some nor async_write. I am using write ( boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/doc/html/boost_asio/reference/… ) –  ravenspoint Sep 11 '11 at 11:38

The key to understanding ASIO is to realize that completion handlers only run in the context of a thread that has called io_service.run() no matter which thread called the asynchronous method. If you've only called io_service.run() in one thread then all completion handlers will execute serially in the context of that thread. If you've called io_service.run() in more than one thread then completion handlers will execute in the context of one of those threads. You can think of this as a thread pool where the threads in the pool are those threads that have called io_service.run() on the same io_service object.

If you have multiple threads call io_service.run() then you can force completion handlers to be serialized by putting them in a strand.

To answer the last part of your question, you should call boost::async_write(). This will dispatch the write operation onto a thread that has called io_service.run() and will invoked the completion handler when the write is done. If you need to serialize this operation then it's a little more complicated and you should read the documentation on strands here.

share|improve this answer
    
A big part of my difficulty is that I do not know what is and is not a 'completion handler'. Is boost::asio::write() a completion handler? Will it 'magically' queue the write operation into the ( different ) thread which called the run() method of the io_service which was passed to the socket constructor? If the answer to both is yes, then my original code is correct and I can relax! –  ravenspoint Sep 9 '11 at 17:58
    
@ravenspoint: boost::asio::write() is a synchronous call so it gets executed as soon as you call it in the context of the thread where the call takes place. boost::asio::async_write() takes a function object as one of it's arguments. When you call boost::asio::async_write() the write operation is 'magically' queued onto the thread that called run(). –  Sean Sep 9 '11 at 18:12
    
@ravenspoint: If you're running on linux it works something like this: When you call io_service::run() the underlying code calls epoll() which blocks the current thread until there's activity on one of it's file descriptors. When you call async_write() it adds the socket file descriptor to the epoll set and associates the completion handler with that file descriptor. When epoll returns the underlying code writes the data and invokes the handler. This all happens in the thread that called run(). –  Sean Sep 9 '11 at 18:15
    
I am prepared to accept that async_write() works as you describe. The snag is that now I have to prevent the writing thread from executing another async_write() call before the first is complete. Sigh. Perhaps posting the functor is easier? At least I have already written and tested the code. –  ravenspoint Sep 9 '11 at 18:24
1  
@ravenspoint: The difference isn't that one blocks and the other doesn't. The difference is that one is synchronous and the other one is asynchronous. In order to execute an asynchronous operation, the operation has to be queued. You can execute a synchronous operation without queuing it, which is what ASIO does. –  Sean Sep 9 '11 at 21:55

After restudying the code for async_write I am now convinced that any write operation is thread safe if and only if the packet size is smaller than

default_max_transfer_size = 65536;

What happens is that as soon as an async_write is called an async_write_some is called in the same thread. Any threads in the pool calling some form of io_service::run will keep on calling async_write_some for that write operation until it completes.

These async_write_some calls can and will interleave if it has to be called more than once (the packets are larger than 65536).

ASIO does not queue writes to a socket as you would expect, one finishing after the other. In order to ensure both thread and interleave safe writes consider the following piece of code:

    void my_connection::async_serialized_write(
            boost::shared_ptr<transmission> outpacket) {
        m_tx_mutex.lock();
        bool in_progress = !m_pending_transmissions.empty();
        m_pending_transmissions.push(outpacket);
        if (!in_progress) {
            if (m_pending_transmissions.front()->scatter_buffers.size() > 0) {
                boost::asio::async_write(m_socket,
                    m_pending_transmissions.front()->scatter_buffers,
                        boost::asio::transfer_all(),
            boost::bind(&my_connection::handle_async_serialized_write,
                        shared_from_this(),
                        boost::asio::placeholders::error,
                                       boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
            } else { // Send single buffer
                boost::asio::async_write(m_socket,
                                    boost::asio::buffer(
                                           m_pending_transmissions.front()->buffer_references.front(),                          m_pending_transmissions.front()->num_bytes_left),
                boost::asio::transfer_all(),
                boost::bind(
                        &my_connection::handle_async_serialized_write,
                        shared_from_this(),
                        boost::asio::placeholders::error,
                        boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
            }
        }
        m_tx_mutex.unlock();
    }

    void my_connection::handle_async_serialized_write(
    const boost::system::error_code& e, size_t bytes_transferred) {
        if (!e) {
            boost::shared_ptr<transmission> transmission;
            m_tx_mutex.lock();
            transmission = m_pending_transmissions.front();
            m_pending_transmissions.pop();
            if (!m_pending_transmissions.empty()) {
                if (m_pending_transmissions.front()->scatter_buffers.size() > 0) {
            boost::asio::async_write(m_socket,
                    m_pending_transmissions.front()->scatter_buffers,
                    boost::asio::transfer_exactly(
                            m_pending_transmissions.front()->num_bytes_left),
                    boost::bind(
                            &chreosis_connection::handle_async_serialized_write,
                            shared_from_this(),
                            boost::asio::placeholders::error,
                            boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
                } else { // Send single buffer
                    boost::asio::async_write(m_socket,
                    boost::asio::buffer(
                            m_pending_transmissions.front()->buffer_references.front(),
                            m_pending_transmissions.front()->num_bytes_left),
                    boost::asio::transfer_all(),
                    boost::bind(
                            &my_connection::handle_async_serialized_write,
                            shared_from_this(),
                            boost::asio::placeholders::error,
                            boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));
                }
            }
            m_tx_mutex.unlock();
            transmission->handler(e, bytes_transferred, transmission);
        } else {
            MYLOG_ERROR(
            m_connection_oid.toString() << " " << "handle_async_serialized_write: " << e.message());
            stop(connection_stop_reasons::stop_async_handler_error);
        }
    }

This basically makes a queue for sending one packet at a time. async_write is called only after the first write succeeds which then calls the original handler for the first write.

It would have been easier if asio made write queues automatic per socket/stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! Since I never would think of sending such large packets, seems like I will be OK. –  ravenspoint Jan 31 '13 at 15:10

It depends if you access same socket object from several threads. Let's say you have two threads running same io_service::run() function.

If for example you do reading and writing simultaneously or may be perform cancel operation from other thread. Then it is not safe.

However if your protocol does only one operation in a time.

  1. If only one thread runs the io_service run then there is no problem. If you want to execute something on the socket from other thread you may call io_service::post() with handler that does this operation on socket so it would be executed in the same thread.
  2. If you have several threads executing io_service::run and you try to do operations simultaneously - let's say cancel and read operation then you should use strands. There is a tutorial for this in Boost.Asio documentation.
share|improve this answer
    
The socket is accessed from several threads. Not all the threads use the io_service. –  ravenspoint Sep 9 '11 at 16:13

According to Nov. 2008 boost 1.37 asio updates, certain synchronous operations including writes "are now thread safe" allowing "concurrent synchronous operations on an individual socket, if supported by the OS" boost 1.37.0 history. This would seem to support what you are seeing but the oversimplification "Shared objects: Unsafe" clause remains in the boost docs for ip::tcp::socket.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for checking. It's a pity that no-one has come by to give an definite answer - just other readers of the docs. BTW your XML editor, foxe, rocks! –  ravenspoint Apr 20 '12 at 17:16

I have been running extensive tests and haven't been able to break asio. Even without locking any mutex.

I would nevertheless advise that you use async_read and async_write with a mutex around each of those calls.

I believe the only draw back is that your completion handlers could be called concurrently if you have more than one thread calling io_service::run.

In my case this has not been an issue. Here is my test code:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
char databuffer[256];
vector<boost::asio::const_buffer> scatter_buffer;
boost::mutex my_test_mutex;
void my_test_func(boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket* socket, boost::asio::io_service *io) {
while(1) {
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::microsec(rand()%1000));

    //my_test_mutex.lock(); // It would be safer 
    socket->async_send(scatter_buffer, boost::bind(&mycallback));
    //my_test_mutex.unlock(); // It would be safer
}
}
int main(int argc, char **argv) {

for(int i = 0; i < 256; ++i)
    databuffer[i] = i;

for(int i = 0; i < 4*90; ++i)
    scatter_buffer.push_back(boost::asio::buffer(databuffer));
boost::asio::io_service my_test_ioservice;
boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket my_test_socket(my_test_ioservice);
boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver my_test_tcp_resolver(my_test_ioservice);
boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::query  my_test_tcp_query("192.168.1.10", "40000");
boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator my_test_tcp_iterator = my_test_tcp_resolver.resolve(my_test_tcp_query);
boost::asio::connect(my_test_socket, my_test_tcp_iterator);
for (size_t i = 0; i < 8; ++i) {
    boost::shared_ptr<boost::thread> thread(
            new boost::thread(my_test_func, &my_test_socket, &my_test_ioservice));
}

while(1) {
    my_test_ioservice.run_one();
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::microsec(rand()%1000));
}
return 0;

}

And here is my makeshift server in python:

import socket
def main():
    mysocket = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    mysocket.bind((socket.gethostname(), 40000))
    mysocket.listen(1)

    while 1:
        (clientsocket, address) = mysocket.accept()
        print("Connection from: " + str(address))
        i = 0
        count = 0
        while i == ord(clientsocket.recv(1)):
            i += 1
            i %= 256

            count+=1
            if count % 1000 == 0:
                print(count/1000)
        print("Error!")
return 0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Please note that running this code can cause your computer to thrash.

share|improve this answer
    
you might want to use typedef to shorten some of that code –  gda2004 Sep 12 '12 at 8:48
    
This code does not really test it correctly. It should send packets far larger than 65536 in order to illustrate that asio is not inherently thread safe for interleaving async_write calls. –  Climax Jan 31 '13 at 14:42

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