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I'm trying to add a transition to a button I have that's background is made with css linear-gradient but it's not working.

This is the css for my button.

a.button
{
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,@green), color-stop(100%,#a5c956));
-webkit-transition: background 5s linear;
}

a.button:hover
{
-webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,@greenhover), color-stop(100%,#89af37))
}

If you're wondering about @green and @greenhover, I'm using .less to make my css.

Anything wrong with this? Any ideas?

share|improve this question

Sadly, you really can't transition gradients for now.

So, the only workable workaround is using an extra element with needed gradient and transition it's opacity: http://jsfiddle.net/kizu/CPZv5/

An pseudo-element can't be used, 'cause only Fx can animate transitions on the pseudo-elements for the moment.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is dated, psudo elements work fine now – Dave Lunny Apr 13 '15 at 15:39
1  
This doesn't always provide the same results. You can use SVG to have a real transition instead – Zach Saucier Apr 19 at 20:27

You can fake gradient transitions using drop shadows! For instance, from one of my pages:

c { 
color: #FFF;
background: #000;
border-style:solid;
border-color:#CCC;
border-width: 0 0 0 1px;
box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #555, inset 0 25px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3),
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
-moz-box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #555, inset 0 25px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3),
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
-o-box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #555, inset 0 25px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3),
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
-webkit-box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #555,
    inset 0 25px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3),
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
-moz-transition: background-color .5s ease; 
-o-transition: background-color .5s ease; 
-webkit-transition: background-color .5s ease-in-out; 
transition: background-color .5s ease;
}

Followed by:

c:hover {
color:#FFF;
background: #505;
position:relative;
top:1px;
box-shadow: -1px -1px -1px #555,inset 0 20px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15), 
        inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
-moz-box-shadow: -1px -1px -1px #555,inset 0 20px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15),
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
-o-box-shadow: -1px -1px -1px #555, inset 0 20px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15), 
        inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
-webkit-box-shadow: 1px -1px -1px #555, inset 0 20px 20px -10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15), 
    inset 0 -15px 20px -10px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3);
}

Here, you are essentially using an inset shadow as a Photoshop-like mask, causing a gradient effect on the underlying element. On hover, you invert the effect.

share|improve this answer
    
This has pretty horrid performance unless it's a very minor transition – Zach Saucier Apr 19 at 20:33

If you're doing the slight highlight when hovering the button there is a much simpler solution. You can just nudge the gradient down a bit and have the background-color be the same as the top color of your gradient: http://cdpn.io/oaByI

It's pretty limited I know, but if works well for that use case.

share|improve this answer

you must have same style in source and changed style in target.

like

a {
   background: transparent;
   background: linear-gradient(transparent,transparent);
   -moz-transition: all 0.3s ease;
   -o-transition: all 0.3s ease;
   -webkit-transition: all 0.3s ease;
   transition: all 0.3s ease;
}
a:hover
{
   background: #abc07c;
   background: linear-gradient(#c5db95,#88a743);
}

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