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Assuming I have the tables student, club, and student_club:

student {
    id
    name
}
club {
    id
    name
}
student_club {
    student_id
    club_id
}

I want to know how to find all students in both the soccer (30) and baseball (50) club.
While this query doesn't work, it's the closest thing I have so far:

SELECT student.*
FROM   student
INNER  JOIN student_club sc ON student.id = sc.student_id
LEFT   JOIN club c ON c.id = sc.club_id
WHERE  c.id = 30 AND c.id = 50
share|improve this question
    
What RDBMS please? –  Martin Smith Sep 9 '11 at 16:56
    
MySQL and PostgreSQL –  Xeoncross Sep 9 '11 at 17:06
    
This was a great question! Thanks for introducing me to the jargon "relational division" used to explain "find the intersection of" in SQL queries. –  Eirik Oct 29 at 18:05

12 Answers 12

up vote 65 down vote accepted
+50

I was curious. And as we all know, curiosity has a reputation for killing cats.

So, which is the fastest way to skin a cat?

The precise cat-skinning environment for this test:

  • PostgreSQL 9.0 on Debian Squeeze with decent RAM and settings.
  • 6.000 students, 24.000 club memberships (data copied from a similar database with real life data.)
  • Slight diversion from the naming schema in the question: student.id is student.stud_id and club.id is club.club_id here.
  • I named the queries after their author in this thread, with an index where there are two.
  • I ran all queries a couple of times to populate the cache, then I picked the best of 5 with EXPLAIN ANALYZE.
  • Relevant indexes (should be the optimum - as long as we lack fore-knowledge which clubs will be queried):

    ALTER TABLE student ADD CONSTRAINT student_pkey PRIMARY KEY(stud_id );
    ALTER TABLE student_club ADD CONSTRAINT sc_pkey PRIMARY KEY(stud_id, club_id);
    ALTER TABLE club       ADD CONSTRAINT club_pkey PRIMARY KEY(club_id );
    CREATE INDEX sc_club_id_idx ON student_club (club_id);
    

    club_pkey is not required by most queries here.
    Primary keys implement unique indexes automatically In PostgreSQL.
    The last index is to make up for this known shortcoming of multi-column indexes on PostgreSQL:

A multicolumn B-tree index can be used with query conditions that involve any subset of the index's columns, but the index is most efficient when there are constraints on the leading (leftmost) columns.

Results:

Total runtimes from EXPLAIN ANALYZE.

1) Martin 2: 44.594 ms

SELECT s.stud_id, s.name
FROM   student s
JOIN   student_club sc USING (stud_id)
WHERE  sc.club_id IN (30, 50)
GROUP  BY 1,2
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1;

2) Erwin 1: 33.217 ms

SELECT s.stud_id, s.name
FROM   student s
JOIN   (
   SELECT stud_id
   FROM   student_club
   WHERE  club_id IN (30, 50)
   GROUP  BY 1
   HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
   ) sc USING (stud_id);

3) Martin 1: 31.735 ms

SELECT s.stud_id, s.name
   FROM   student s
   WHERE  student_id IN (
   SELECT student_id
   FROM   student_club
   WHERE  club_id = 30
   INTERSECT
   SELECT stud_id
   FROM   student_club
   WHERE  club_id = 50);

4) Derek: 2.287 ms

SELECT s.stud_id,  s.name
FROM   student s
WHERE  s.stud_id IN (SELECT stud_id FROM student_club WHERE club_id = 30)
AND    s.stud_id IN (SELECT stud_id FROM student_club WHERE club_id = 50);

5) Erwin 2: 2.181 ms

SELECT s.stud_id,  s.name
FROM   student s
WHERE  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM student_club
               WHERE  stud_id = s.stud_id AND club_id = 30)
AND    EXISTS (SELECT * FROM student_club
               WHERE  stud_id = s.stud_id AND club_id = 50);

6) Sean: 2.043 ms

SELECT s.stud_id, s.name
FROM   student s
JOIN   student_club x ON s.stud_id = x.stud_id
JOIN   student_club y ON s.stud_id = y.stud_id
WHERE  x.club_id = 30
AND    y.club_id = 50;

The last three perform pretty much the same. 4) and 5) result in the same query plan.

Late Additions:

Fancy SQL, but the performance can't keep up.

7) ypercube 1: 148.649 ms

SELECT s.stud_id,  s.name
FROM   student AS s
WHERE  NOT EXISTS (
   SELECT *
   FROM   club AS c 
   WHERE  c.club_id IN (30, 50)
   AND    NOT EXISTS (
      SELECT *
      FROM   student_club AS sc 
      WHERE  sc.stud_id = s.stud_id
      AND    sc.club_id = c.club_id  
      )
   );

8) ypercube 2: 147.497 ms

SELECT s.stud_id,  s.name
FROM   student AS s
WHERE  NOT EXISTS (
   SELECT *
   FROM  (
      SELECT 30 AS club_id  
      UNION  ALL
      SELECT 50
      ) AS c
   WHERE NOT EXISTS (
      SELECT *
      FROM   student_club AS sc 
      WHERE  sc.stud_id = s.stud_id
      AND    sc.club_id = c.club_id  
      )
   );

As expected, those two perform almost the same. Query plan results in table scans, the planner doesn't find a way to use the indexes here.


9) wildplasser 1: 49.849 ms

WITH RECURSIVE two AS (
   SELECT 1::int AS level
        , stud_id
   FROM   student_club sc1
   WHERE  sc1.club_id = 30
   UNION
   SELECT two.level + 1 AS level
        , sc2.stud_id
   FROM   student_club sc2
   JOIN   two USING (stud_id)
   WHERE  sc2.club_id = 50
   AND    two.level = 1
   )
SELECT s.stud_id, s.student
FROM   student s
JOIN   two USING (studid)
WHERE  two.level > 1;

Fancy SQL, decent performance for a CTE. Very exotic query plan.
Again, would be interesting how 9.1 handles this. I am going to upgrade the db cluster used here to 9.1 soon. Maybe I'll rerun the whole shebang ...


10) wildplasser 2: 36.986 ms

WITH sc AS (
   SELECT stud_id
   FROM   student_club
   WHERE  club_id IN (30,50)
   GROUP  BY stud_id
   HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
   )
SELECT s.*
FROM   student s
JOIN   sc USING (stud_id);

CTE variant of query 2). Surprisingly, it can result in a slightly different query plan with the exact same data. I found a sequential scan on student, where the subquery-variant used the index.


11) ypercube 3: 101.482 ms

Another late addition @ypercube. It is positively amazing, how many ways there are.

SELECT s.stud_id, s.student
FROM   student s
JOIN   student_club sc USING (stud_id)
WHERE  sc.club_id = 10                 -- member in 1st club ...
AND    NOT EXISTS (
   SELECT *
   FROM  (SELECT 14 AS club_id) AS c  -- can't be excluded for missing the 2nd
   WHERE  NOT EXISTS (
      SELECT *
      FROM   student_club AS d
      WHERE  d.stud_id = sc.stud_id
      AND    d.club_id = c.club_id
      )
   )

12) erwin 3: 2.377 ms

@ypercube's 11) is actually just the mind-twisting reverse approach of this simpler variant, that was also still missing. Performs almost as fast as the top cats.

SELECT s.*
FROM   student s
JOIN   student_club x USING (stud_id)
WHERE  sc.club_id = 10                 -- member in 1st club ...
AND    EXISTS (                        -- ... and membership in 2nd exists
   SELECT *
   FROM   student_club AS y
   WHERE  y.stud_id = s.stud_id
   AND    y.club_id = 14
   )

13) erwin 4: 2.375 ms

Hard to believe, but here's another, genuinely new variant. I see potential for more than two memberships, but it also ranks among the top cats with just two.

SELECT s.*
FROM   student AS s
WHERE  EXISTS (
   SELECT *
   FROM   student_club AS x
   JOIN   student_club AS y USING (stud_id)
   WHERE  x.stud_id = s.stud_id
   AND    x.club_id = 14
   AND    y.club_id = 10
   )
share|improve this answer
1  
Brandstetter, Very nice work. I started a bounty on this question to give you extra credit (but I have to wait 24hrs). Anyway, I wonder how these queries go when you starting adding multiple club_id's instead of just two... –  Xeoncross Oct 17 '11 at 17:58
    
@Xeoncross: Kudos to your generous gesture. :) With more club_ids I suspect that 1) and 2) will get closer in speed, but it would have to be a bigger number to topple the ranking. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 17 '11 at 18:19
    
if you have more than a couple of clubs then create another table which contains those clubs. Then join to that table in your select. –  Paul Morgan Oct 17 '11 at 22:34
    
@Erwin: Thnx (for the benchmarks). Not nitpicking, but perhaps you can try those queries (I mean all, not just mine) with a (student_id, club_id) (or the reverse) index. –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 6:13
3  
Am I wrong in thinking that anything under 200 ms is acceptable performance, given the domain in question and the sample size? For personal interest, I performed my own tests on SQL Server 2008 R2 using the same structure indexes and (I think) spread of data but scaling to a million students (a reasonably large set for the given domain, I feel) and there still wasn't much to separate the different approaches, IMO. Of course, the ones based on relational division could target a base table, giving them the advantage of 'extensibility'. –  onedaywhen Oct 21 '11 at 7:55
SELECT s.*
FROM student s
INNER JOIN student_club sc_soccer ON s.id = sc_soccer.student_id
INNER JOIN student_club sc_baseball ON s.id = sc_baseball.student_id
WHERE 
 sc_baseball.club_id = 50 AND 
 sc_soccer.club_id = 30
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! I have always used exists but this one is better. –  Endy Tjahjono Oct 18 '11 at 15:56
select *
from student
where id in (select student_id from student_club where club_id = 30)
and id in (select student_id from student_club where club_id = 50)
share|improve this answer
    
This query works fine, but something bothers me about having to ask the RDBMS to check so many indexes * the number of clubs. –  Xeoncross Sep 9 '11 at 17:11
3  
I like this query the most because resembles a clean style, its like python in sql. I would happily trade 0.44ms (diff with Sean's query) for this kind of code. –  Manuel Gutierrez Jan 30 '13 at 21:56
SELECT *
FROM   student
WHERE  id IN (SELECT student_id
              FROM   student_club
              WHERE  club_id = 30
              INTERSECT
              SELECT student_id
              FROM   student_club
              WHERE  club_id = 50)  

Or a more general solution easier to extend to n clubs and that avoids INTERSECT (not available in MySQL) and IN (as performance of this sucks in MySQL)

SELECT s.id,
       s.name
FROM   student s
       join student_club sc
         ON s.id = sc.student_id
WHERE  sc.club_id IN ( 30, 50 )
GROUP  BY s.id,
          s.name
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT sc.club_id) = 2  
share|improve this answer
    
Without a doubt, your second answer is the best for queries that are being generated by code. Am I seriously going to write 10 joins or subqueries to find the relational division of 10 criteria? Heck no, I'll use this brilliant solution, instead. Thanks for teaching me what HAVING does in MySQL. –  Eirik Oct 29 at 18:07

If you just want student_id then:

    Select student_id
      from student_club
     where club_id in ( 30, 50 )
  group by student_id
    having count( student_id ) = 2

If you also need name from student then:

Select student_id, name
  from student s
 where exists( select *
                 from student_club sc
                where s.student_id = sc.student_id
                  and club_id in ( 30, 50 )
             group by sc.student_id
               having count( sc.student_id ) = 2 )

If you have more than two clubs in a club_selection table then:

Select student_id, name
  from student s
 where exists( select *
                 from student_club sc
                where s.student_id = sc.student_id
                  and exists( select * 
                                from club_selection cs
                               where sc.club_id = cs.club_id )
             group by sc.student_id
               having count( sc.student_id ) = ( select count( * )
                                                   from club_selection ) )
share|improve this answer
    
The first two are the included in / the same as my query 1. But the third one addresses @Xeoncross' added question in the comments above. I would vote for that part without the dupes. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 17 '11 at 23:32
    
Thanks for the comment but I'm also demonstrating some formatting. I'll leave it 'as is'. –  Paul Morgan Oct 19 '11 at 1:30
    
Fair enough. +1 for the solution to the additional question. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 19 '11 at 1:42

Another CTE. It looks clean, but it will probably generate the same plan as a groupby in a normal subquery.

WITH two AS (
    SELECT student_id FROM tmp.student_club
    WHERE club_id IN (30,50)
    GROUP BY student_id
    HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
    )
SELECT st.* FROM tmp.student st
JOIN two ON (two.student_id=st.id)
    ;

For those who want to test, a copy of my generate testdata thingy:

DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA tmp;

CREATE TABLE tmp.student
    ( id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
    , sname VARCHAR
    );

CREATE TABLE tmp.club
    ( id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
    , cname VARCHAR
    );

CREATE TABLE tmp.student_club
    ( student_id INTEGER NOT NULL  REFERENCES tmp.student(id)
    , club_id INTEGER NOT NULL  REFERENCES tmp.club(id)
    );

INSERT INTO tmp.student(id)
    SELECT generate_series(1,1000)
    ;

INSERT INTO tmp.club(id)
    SELECT generate_series(1,100)
    ;

INSERT INTO tmp.student_club(student_id,club_id)
    SELECT st.id  , cl.id
    FROM tmp.student st, tmp.club cl
    ;

DELETE FROM tmp.student_club
WHERE random() < 0.8
    ;

UPDATE tmp.student SET sname = 'Student#' || id::text ;
UPDATE tmp.club SET cname = 'Soccer' WHERE id = 30;
UPDATE tmp.club SET cname = 'Baseball' WHERE id = 50;

ALTER TABLE tmp.student_club
    ADD PRIMARY KEY (student_id,club_id)
    ;
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's in effect just a subquery with group by like in my first version. Same query plan + CTE overhead results in same performance + a bit for the CTE. Nice test setup, though. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 19 '11 at 20:52
    
I don't know if there is a CTE-overhead. Distribution of the testdata is very important. So is availability of statistics: after VACUUM ANALYZE the running time went from 67.4 to 1.56 ms. Only hash and bitmaps involved in the QP. –  wildplasser Oct 19 '11 at 21:16
    
That's special in your case, after deleting 80 % of a big table and updating a lot you had more dead tuples than anything else. No wonder, vacuum analyze helps a lot. I ran both variants with and without CTE, and surprisingly the query plans were not identical. or better yet, I'll open a chat room for that. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 19 '11 at 21:25
    
Don't worry, I knew about the 80% dead rows... I think the statistics matter as well. But the histogram is rather 'flat', given randomly deleting. Maybe it is just the estimate of needed pages that changes enough to make the planner decide to switch plans. –  wildplasser Oct 19 '11 at 21:32

So there's more than one way to skin a cat.
I'll to add two more to make it, well, more complete.

1) GROUP first, JOIN later

Assuming a sane data model where (student_id, club_id) is unique in student_club. Martin Smith's second version is like somewhat similar, but he joins first, groups later. This should be faster:

SELECT s.id, s.name
  FROM student s
  JOIN (
   SELECT student_id
     FROM student_club
    WHERE club_id IN (30, 50)
    GROUP BY 1
   HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
       ) sc USING (student_id);

2) EXISTS

And of course, there is the classic EXISTS. Similar to Derek's variant with IN. Simple and fast. (In MySQL, this should be quite a bit faster than the variant with IN):

SELECT s.id, s.name
  FROM student s
 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM student_club
               WHERE  student_id = s.student_id AND club_id = 30)
   AND EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM student_club
               WHERE  student_id = s.student_id AND club_id = 50);
share|improve this answer
WITH RECURSIVE two AS
    ( SELECT 1::integer AS level
    , student_id
    FROM tmp.student_club sc0
    WHERE sc0.club_id = 30
    UNION
    SELECT 1+two.level AS level
    , sc1.student_id
    FROM tmp.student_club sc1
    JOIN two ON (two.student_id = sc1.student_id)
    WHERE sc1.club_id = 50
    AND two.level=1
    )
SELECT st.* FROM tmp.student st
JOIN two ON (two.student_id=st.id)
WHERE two.level> 1

    ;

This seems to perform reasonably well, since the CTE-scan avoids the need for two separate subqueries.

There is always a reason to misuse recursive queries!

(BTW: mysql does not seem to have recursive queries)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for finding yet another halfway decent way to to it! I added your query to the benchmark. Hope that is ok with you. :) –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 19 '11 at 1:02
    
It's Ok. But it was intended as a joke, of course. CTE actually performs well if more 'stray' student*club records are added. (For testing I used 1000 students * 100 clubs, and deleted 80% randomly) –  wildplasser Oct 19 '11 at 8:20

Since noone has added this (classic) version:

SELECT s.*
FROM student AS s
WHERE NOT EXISTS
      ( SELECT *
        FROM club AS c 
        WHERE c.id IN (30, 50)
          AND NOT EXISTS
              ( SELECT *
                FROM student_club AS sc 
                WHERE sc.student_id = s.id
                  AND sc.club_id = c.id  
              )
      )

or similar:

SELECT s.*
FROM student AS s
WHERE NOT EXISTS
      ( SELECT *
        FROM
          ( SELECT 30 AS club_id  
          UNION ALL
            SELECT 50
          ) AS c
        WHERE NOT EXISTS
              ( SELECT *
                FROM student_club AS sc 
                WHERE sc.student_id = s.id
                  AND sc.club_id = c.club_id  
              )
      )

One more try with a slightly different approach. Inspired by an article in Explain Extended: Multiple attributes in a EAV table: GROUP BY vs. NOT EXISTS:

SELECT s.*
FROM student_club AS sc
  JOIN student AS s
    ON s.student_id = sc.student_id
WHERE sc.club_id = 50                      --- one option here
  AND NOT EXISTS
      ( SELECT *
        FROM
          ( SELECT 30 AS club_id           --- all the rest in here
                                           --- as in previous query
          ) AS c
        WHERE NOT EXISTS
              ( SELECT *
                FROM student_club AS scc 
                WHERE scc.student_id = sc.id
                  AND scc.club_id = c.club_id  
              )
      )

Another approach:

SELECT s.stud_id
FROM   student s

EXCEPT

SELECT stud_id
FROM 
  ( SELECT s.stud_id, c.club_id
    FROM student s 
      CROSS JOIN (VALUES (30),(50)) c (club_id)
  EXCEPT
    SELECT stud_id, club_id
    FROM student_club
    WHERE club_id IN (30, 50)   -- optional. Not needed but may affect performance
  ) x ;   
share|improve this answer
    
+1 .. nice additions to the not so complete catskin-collection! :) I added them to benchmark. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 18 '11 at 0:44
    
It's not a fair fight :) The big advantage of a relational division such as this is the divisor can be a base table so that altering the divisor is very cheap i.e. contrast updating rows in a base table targeted by the same query with changing the SQL query each time. –  onedaywhen Oct 20 '11 at 12:32
    
@ErwinBrandstetter: Would it be possible to add the 3rd variation in your tests? –  ypercube Feb 22 '12 at 23:51
    
@ypercube: You got it. Pretty twisted version. :) –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 24 '12 at 6:38
1  
@Erwin: When you manage to waste some time on this, can you also try with having two UNIQUE Keys, on both (stud_id, club_id) and (club_id, stud_id) (or Primary and Unique)? I still think that for some of those queries, the difference from 2 to 140 ms is too high to be explained by the differences in execution plans. –  ypercube Feb 24 '12 at 12:44

Different query plans in query 2) and 10)

I tested in a real life db, so the names differ from the catskin list. It's a backup copy, so nothing changed during all test runs (except minor changes to the catalogs).

Query 2)

SELECT a.*
FROM   ef.adr a
JOIN (
    SELECT adr_id
    FROM   ef.adratt
    WHERE  att_id IN (10,14)
    GROUP  BY adr_id
    HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) t using (adr_id);

Merge Join  (cost=630.10..1248.78 rows=627 width=295) (actual time=13.025..34.726 rows=67 loops=1)
  Merge Cond: (a.adr_id = adratt.adr_id)
  ->  Index Scan using adr_pkey on adr a  (cost=0.00..523.39 rows=5767 width=295) (actual time=0.023..11.308 rows=5356 loops=1)
  ->  Sort  (cost=630.10..636.37 rows=627 width=4) (actual time=12.891..13.004 rows=67 loops=1)
        Sort Key: adratt.adr_id
        Sort Method:  quicksort  Memory: 28kB
        ->  HashAggregate  (cost=450.87..488.49 rows=627 width=4) (actual time=12.386..12.710 rows=67 loops=1)
              Filter: (count(*) > 1)
              ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on adratt  (cost=97.66..394.81 rows=2803 width=4) (actual time=0.245..5.958 rows=2811 loops=1)
                    Recheck Cond: (att_id = ANY ('{10,14}'::integer[]))
                    ->  Bitmap Index Scan on adratt_att_id_idx  (cost=0.00..94.86 rows=2803 width=0) (actual time=0.217..0.217 rows=2811 loops=1)
                          Index Cond: (att_id = ANY ('{10,14}'::integer[]))
Total runtime: 34.928 ms

Query 10)

WITH two AS (
    SELECT adr_id
    FROM   ef.adratt
    WHERE  att_id IN (10,14)
    GROUP  BY adr_id
    HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
    )
SELECT a.*
FROM   ef.adr a
JOIN   two using (adr_id);

Hash Join  (cost=1161.52..1261.84 rows=627 width=295) (actual time=36.188..37.269 rows=67 loops=1)
  Hash Cond: (two.adr_id = a.adr_id)
  CTE two
    ->  HashAggregate  (cost=450.87..488.49 rows=627 width=4) (actual time=13.059..13.447 rows=67 loops=1)
          Filter: (count(*) > 1)
          ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on adratt  (cost=97.66..394.81 rows=2803 width=4) (actual time=0.252..6.252 rows=2811 loops=1)
                Recheck Cond: (att_id = ANY ('{10,14}'::integer[]))
                ->  Bitmap Index Scan on adratt_att_id_idx  (cost=0.00..94.86 rows=2803 width=0) (actual time=0.226..0.226 rows=2811 loops=1)
                      Index Cond: (att_id = ANY ('{10,14}'::integer[]))
  ->  CTE Scan on two  (cost=0.00..50.16 rows=627 width=4) (actual time=13.065..13.677 rows=67 loops=1)
  ->  Hash  (cost=384.68..384.68 rows=5767 width=295) (actual time=23.097..23.097 rows=5767 loops=1)
        Buckets: 1024  Batches: 1  Memory Usage: 1153kB
        ->  Seq Scan on adr a  (cost=0.00..384.68 rows=5767 width=295) (actual time=0.005..10.955 rows=5767 loops=1)
Total runtime: 37.482 ms
share|improve this answer
    
@wildplasser: See the diverging query plans! Unexpected for me. pg 9.0. Chat room was unwieldy, so I abuse an answer here. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 19 '11 at 21:49
    
Weird scenes. Basically the same QP here(9.0.1-beta-something) for the CTE: seq scan+bitmap instead of an index scan+merge. Maybe a flaw in the optimiser's cost-heuristics? I'm going to produce yet another CTE abuse... –  wildplasser Oct 19 '11 at 22:17

@erwin-brandstetter Please, benchmark this:

SELECT s.stud_id, s.name
FROM   student s, student_club x, student_club y
WHERE  x.club_id = 30
AND    s.stud_id = x.stud_id
AND    y.club_id = 50
AND    s.stud_id = y.stud_id;

It's like number 6) by @sean , just cleaner, I guess.

share|improve this answer
2  
You must know that@-notifying only works in comments, not in answers. I stumbled upon this post by chance. Query plan and performance of your query are identical to Sean's query. It is effectively the same, but Sean's query with explicit JOIN syntax is the generally preferred form, because it's clearer. +1 for yet another valid answer, though! –  Erwin Brandstetter Jun 14 '12 at 21:25
-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
WITH two AS (
    SELECT c0.student_id
    FROM tmp.student_club c0
    , tmp.student_club c1
    WHERE c0.student_id = c1.student_id
    AND c0.club_id = 30
    AND c1.club_id = 50
    )
SELECT st.* FROM tmp.student st
JOIN two ON (two.student_id=st.id)
    ;

The query plan:

 Hash Join  (cost=1904.76..1919.09 rows=337 width=15) (actual time=6.937..8.771 rows=324 loops=1)
   Hash Cond: (two.student_id = st.id)
   CTE two
     ->  Hash Join  (cost=849.97..1645.76 rows=337 width=4) (actual time=4.932..6.488 rows=324 loops=1)
           Hash Cond: (c1.student_id = c0.student_id)
           ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on student_club c1  (cost=32.76..796.94 rows=1614 width=4) (actual time=0.667..1.835 rows=1646 loops=1)
                 Recheck Cond: (club_id = 50)
                 ->  Bitmap Index Scan on sc_club_id_idx  (cost=0.00..32.36 rows=1614 width=0) (actual time=0.473..0.473 rows=1646 loops=1)                     
                       Index Cond: (club_id = 50)
           ->  Hash  (cost=797.00..797.00 rows=1617 width=4) (actual time=4.203..4.203 rows=1620 loops=1)
                 Buckets: 1024  Batches: 1  Memory Usage: 57kB
                 ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on student_club c0  (cost=32.79..797.00 rows=1617 width=4) (actual time=0.663..3.596 rows=1620 loops=1)                   
                       Recheck Cond: (club_id = 30)
                       ->  Bitmap Index Scan on sc_club_id_idx  (cost=0.00..32.38 rows=1617 width=0) (actual time=0.469..0.469 rows=1620 loops=1)
                             Index Cond: (club_id = 30)
   ->  CTE Scan on two  (cost=0.00..6.74 rows=337 width=4) (actual time=4.935..6.591 rows=324 loops=1)
   ->  Hash  (cost=159.00..159.00 rows=8000 width=15) (actual time=1.979..1.979 rows=8000 loops=1)
         Buckets: 1024  Batches: 1  Memory Usage: 374kB
         ->  Seq Scan on student st  (cost=0.00..159.00 rows=8000 width=15) (actual time=0.093..0.759 rows=8000 loops=1)
 Total runtime: 8.989 ms
(20 rows)

So it still seems to want the seq scan on student.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't wait to see if that has been fixed in 9.1. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 20 '11 at 1:34

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