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I would like to take a string

var a = "http://example.com/aa/bb/"

and process it into an object such that

a.hostname == "example.com"

and

a.pathname == "/aa/bb"
share|improve this question
3  
In case you're working on the current URL, you can access hostname and pathname directly from the location object. –  rvighne Jun 26 '14 at 14:54

13 Answers 13

up vote 154 down vote accepted
var getLocation = function(href) {
    var l = document.createElement("a");
    l.href = href;
    return l;
};
var l = getLocation("http://example.com/path");
console.debug(l.hostname)
>> "example.com"
console.debug(l.pathname)
>> "/path"
share|improve this answer
9  
Are you sure this is a cross-browser compatible solution? –  roosteronacid Apr 10 '09 at 9:55
    
href is a special DOM attribute type with those additional URI-like properties on it. Very interesting! –  Rex M Apr 10 '09 at 16:59
17  
It should be noted that, while this may help/answer the original poster, this answer will only work for people doing JS work in a browser, since it relies on the DOM to do its work. –  Adam Batkin Aug 1 '09 at 22:21
3  
Another example of simplicity, alongside ingenuity. –  Saeed Neamati Feb 21 '12 at 13:50
15  
Does not work in IE if the href is relative. l.hostname will be empty. If you're only providing full URL's then this will work. –  Derek Sep 6 '12 at 18:21

found here: https://gist.github.com/jlong/2428561

var parser = document.createElement('a');
parser.href = "http://example.com:3000/pathname/?search=test#hash";

parser.protocol; // => "http:"
parser.host;     // => "example.com:3000"
parser.hostname; // => "example.com"
parser.port;     // => "3000"
parser.pathname; // => "/pathname/"
parser.hash;     // => "#hash"
parser.search;   // => "?search=test"
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that if you just want to get the parsed parts of the current browser location, the 1st two lines become parser = location; and all the following lines work. Tried it in Chrome and IE9 just now. –  Lee Meador Apr 26 '13 at 17:20
2  
Also note that pathname doesn't include the leading slash in IE. Go figure. :D –  nevelis Feb 21 '14 at 6:45
1  
For IE, use "/" + parser.pathname –  sbose Feb 27 '14 at 11:07
    
Warning: it will return http: even if you pass just domain.com to href (without any protocol). I wanted to use this to check if the protocol was missing, and if so I could add it, but it assumes http: so was unable to use it for this purpose. –  Max Hodges Oct 30 '14 at 6:27
1  
Does not work for relative URLs in IE9 –  Blaise Nov 27 '14 at 11:03

freddiefujiwara's answer is pretty good but I also needed to support relative URLs within Internet Explorer. I came up with the following solution:

function getLocation(href) {
    var location = document.createElement("a");
    location.href = href;
    // IE doesn't populate all link properties when setting .href with a relative URL,
    // however .href will return an absolute URL which then can be used on itself
    // to populate these additional fields.
    if (location.host == "") {
      location.href = location.href;
    }
    return location;
};

Now use it to get the needed properties:

var a = getLocation('http://example.com/aa/bb/');
document.write(a.hostname);
document.write(a.pathname);

JSFiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/6AEAB/

share|improve this answer
1  
This should be the accepted answer. Very clever use of relative-to-absolute URL handling. +1 –  L0j1k May 30 '14 at 16:52

Here's a simple function using a regexp that imitates the a tag behavior.

Pros

  • predictable behaviour (no cross browser issues)
  • doesn't need the DOM
  • it's really short.

Cons

  • The regexp is a bit difficult to read

-

function getLocation(href) {
    var match = href.match(/^(https?\:)\/\/(([^:\/?#]*)(?:\:([0-9]+))?)(\/[^?#]*)(\?[^#]*|)(#.*|)$/);
    return match && {
        protocol: match[1],
        host: match[2],
        hostname: match[3],
        port: match[4],
        pathname: match[5],
        search: match[6],
        hash: match[7]
    }
}

-

getLocation("http://example.com/");
/*
{
    "protocol": "http:",
    "host": "example.com",
    "hostname": "example.com",
    "port": undefined,
    "pathname": "/"
    "search": "",
    "hash": "",
}
*/

getLocation("http://example.com:3000/pathname/?search=test#hash");
/*
{
    "protocol": "http:",
    "host": "example.com:3000",
    "hostname": "example.com",
    "port": "3000",
    "pathname": "/pathname/",
    "search": "?search=test",
    "hash": "#hash"
}
*/

EDIT:

Here's a breakdown of the regular expression

var reURLInformation = new RegExp([
    '^(https?:)//', // protocol
    '(([^:/?#]*)(?::([0-9]+))?)', // host (hostname and port)
    '(/[^?#]*)', // pathname
    '(\\?[^#]*|)', // search
    '(#.*|)$' // hash
].join(''));
var match = href.match(reURLInformation);
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work with any relative URLs. Did you follow RFC-3986 when making the regexp? > getLocation("//example.com/"); null > getLocation("/pathname/?search"); null > getLocation("/pathname/"); null > getLocation("relative"); null –  gregers May 7 '14 at 8:26
1  
I like how this does not use the DOM, but gregers has a good point. It would be nice if this can handle relative paths. It would require to use window.location (an a element) to fill in the blanks and adding code. In that case, the method would become hypocritical. Unless there is an alternative, not sure how this can be solved perfectly. –  Turbo Sep 24 '14 at 22:11

The modern way:

new URL("/aa/bb/", "http://example.com/")

Returns an object with properties hostname and pathname, along with a few others. The first argument is a relative or absolute URL; if it's relative, then you need to specify the second argument (the base URL).

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice! Relative URLs break it though... :( new URL('/stuff?foo=bar#baz')-> SyntaxError: Failed to construct 'URL': Invalid URL –  lakenen Jun 10 '14 at 20:25
2  
@lakenen: I added a fix to my answer. –  rvighne Jun 26 '14 at 15:07
    
The only problem is now you have to parse whether it's relative or absolute yourself. IMO this should just be handled by URL. Maybe we can get it into the spec? :P –  lakenen Jun 26 '14 at 18:29
1  
The relative part is a separate argument rather than concatenation. eg: new URL( path, baseURL ) –  Adria Nov 15 '14 at 18:44
1  
Experimental technology: IE doens't support this! developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/URL/… –  cwouter Mar 18 at 15:08

js-uri (available on Google Code) takes a string URL and resolves a URI object from it:

var some_uri = new URI("http://www.example.com/foo/bar");

alert(some_uri.authority); // www.example.com
alert(some_uri);           // http://www.example.com/foo/bar

var blah      = new URI("blah");
var blah_full = blah.resolve(some_uri);
alert(blah_full);         // http://www.example.com/foo/blah
share|improve this answer
    
thanks!!! but I want to uri = new Location("example.com/aa/bb") typeof(window.location) == typeof(uri) –  freddiefujiwara Apr 10 '09 at 2:30
    
Since window.location is a string, I don't really see how that would be possible or helpful. Why do the types need to match when you can easily convert from one to the other? –  Rex M Apr 10 '09 at 2:33
    
developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.location is very nice api!! so I hope convert String to window.location object –  freddiefujiwara Apr 10 '09 at 2:48
1  
Setting window.location changes the browser so it is not going to happen. –  epascarello Apr 10 '09 at 3:06
1  
Hmm that's right. window.location is not a string, but can be assigned from a string. I'm not sure if that can be mimicked, I've tried assigning the prototype of location to a new uri object but that did not work. –  Rex M Apr 10 '09 at 3:53

You can also use parse_url() function from php.js project.

Code:

parse_url('http://username:password@hostname/path?arg=value#anchor');

Result:

{
  scheme: 'http',
  host: 'hostname',
  user: 'username',
  pass: 'password',
  path: '/path',
  query: 'arg=value',
  fragment: 'anchor'
}
share|improve this answer

For those looking for a modern solution that works in IE, Firefox, AND Chrome:

None of these solutions that use a hyperlink element will work the same in chrome. If you pass an invalid (or blank) url to chrome, it will always return the host where the script is called from. So in IE you will get blank, whereas in Chrome you will get localhost (or whatever).

If you are trying to look at the referrer, this is deceitful. You will want to make sure that the host you get back was in the original url to deal with this:

    function getHostNameFromUrl(url) {
        // <summary>Parses the domain/host from a given url.</summary>
        var a = document.createElement("a");
        a.href = url;

        // Handle chrome which will default to domain where script is called from if invalid
        return url.indexOf(a.hostname) != -1 ? a.hostname : '';
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is a very important thing to consider! –  2rs2ts Dec 31 '13 at 14:58
    
This completely breaks relative urls, though! –  lakenen Jun 10 '14 at 20:23

Here is a version that I copied from https://gist.github.com/1847816, but rewritten so it's easier to read and debug. The purpose of copying the of the anchor data to another variable named "result" is because the anchor data is pretty long, and so copying a limited number of values to the result will help simplify the result.

/**
 * See: https://gist.github.com/1847816
 * Parse a URI, returning an object similar to Location
 * Usage: var uri = parseUri("hello?search#hash")
 */
function parseUri(url) {

  var result = {};

  var anchor = document.createElement('a');
  anchor.href = url;

  var keys = 'protocol hostname host pathname port search hash href'.split(' ');
  for (keyIndex in keys) {
    var currentKey = keys[keyIndex]; 
    result[currentKey] = anchor[currentKey];
  }

  result.toString = function() { return anchor.href; };
  result.requestUri = result.pathname + result.search;  
  return result;

};
share|improve this answer

The AngularJS way - fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/PT5BG/4/

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Parse URL using AngularJS</title>
</head>
<body ng-app ng-controller="AppCtrl" ng-init="init()">

<h3>Parse URL using AngularJS</h3>

url: <input type="text" ng-model="url" value="" style="width:780px;">

<ul>
    <li>href = {{parser.href}}</li>
    <li>protocol = {{parser.protocol}}</li>
    <li>host = {{parser.host}}</li>
    <li>hostname = {{parser.hostname}}</li>
    <li>port = {{parser.port}}</li>
    <li>pathname = {{parser.pathname}}</li>
    <li>hash = {{parser.hash}}</li>
    <li>search = {{parser.search}}</li>
</ul>

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.6/angular.min.js"></script>

<script>
function AppCtrl($scope) {

    $scope.$watch('url', function() {
        $scope.parser.href = $scope.url;
    });

    $scope.init = function() {
        $scope.parser = document.createElement('a');
        $scope.url = window.location;
    }

}
</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
It will be more angular if you will use $document and $window services –  Cherniv Sep 28 '14 at 6:26

Simple and robust solution using the module pattern. This includes a fix for IE where the pathname does not always have a leading forward-slash (/).

I have created a Gist along with a JSFiddle which offers a more dynamic parser. I recommend you check it out and provide feedback.

var URLParser = (function (document) {
    var PROPS = 'protocol hostname host pathname port search hash href'.split(' ');
    var self = function (url) {
        this.aEl = document.createElement('a');
        this.parse(url);
    };
    self.prototype.parse = function (url) {
        this.aEl.href = url;
        if (this.aEl.host == "") {
           this.aEl.href = this.aEl.href;
        }
        PROPS.forEach(function (prop) {
            switch (prop) {
                case 'hash':
                    this[prop] = this.aEl[prop].substr(1);
                    break;
                default:
                    this[prop] = this.aEl[prop];
            }
        }, this);
        if (this.pathname.indexOf('/') !== 0) {
            this.pathname = '/' + this.pathname;
        }
        this.requestUri = this.pathname + this.search;
    };
    self.prototype.toObj = function () {
        var obj = {};
        PROPS.forEach(function (prop) {
            obj[prop] = this[prop];
        }, this);
        obj.requestUri = this.requestUri;
        return obj;
    };
    self.prototype.toString = function () {
        return this.href;
    };
    return self;
})(document);

Demo

var URLParser = (function(document) {
  var PROPS = 'protocol hostname host pathname port search hash href'.split(' ');
  var self = function(url) {
    this.aEl = document.createElement('a');
    this.parse(url);
  };
  self.prototype.parse = function(url) {
    this.aEl.href = url;
    if (this.aEl.host == "") {
      this.aEl.href = this.aEl.href;
    }
    PROPS.forEach(function(prop) {
      switch (prop) {
        case 'hash':
          this[prop] = this.aEl[prop].substr(1);
          break;
        default:
          this[prop] = this.aEl[prop];
      }
    }, this);
    if (this.pathname.indexOf('/') !== 0) {
      this.pathname = '/' + this.pathname;
    }
    this.requestUri = this.pathname + this.search;
  };
  self.prototype.toObj = function() {
    var obj = {};
    PROPS.forEach(function(prop) {
      obj[prop] = this[prop];
    }, this);
    obj.requestUri = this.requestUri;
    return obj;
  };
  self.prototype.toString = function() {
    return this.href;
  };
  return self;
})(document);

/* Main */
var out = document.getElementById('out');
var urls = [
  'https://www.example.org:5887/foo/bar?a=1&b=2#section-1',
  'ftp://www.files.com:22/folder?id=7'
];
var parser = new URLParser();
urls.forEach(function(url) {
  parser.parse(url);
  println(out, JSON.stringify(parser.toObj(), undefined, ' '), 0, '#0000A7');
});

/* Utility functions */
function print(el, text, bgColor, fgColor) {
  var span = document.createElement('span');
  span.innerHTML = text;
  span.style['backgroundColor'] = bgColor || '#FFFFFF';
  span.style['color'] = fgColor || '#000000';
  el.appendChild(span);
}
function println(el, text, bgColor, fgColor) {
  print(el, text, bgColor, fgColor);
  el.appendChild(document.createElement('br'));
}
body {
  background: #444;
}
span {
  background-color: #fff;
  border: thin solid black;
  display: inline-block;
}
#out {
  display: block;
  font-family: Consolas, Menlo, Monaco, Lucida Console, Liberation Mono, DejaVu Sans Mono, Bitstream Vera Sans Mono, Courier New, monospace, serif;
  font-size: 12px;
  white-space: pre;
}
<div id="out"></div>

Output

{
 "protocol": "https:",
 "hostname": "www.example.org",
 "host": "www.example.org:5887",
 "pathname": "/foo/bar",
 "port": "5887",
 "search": "?a=1&b=2",
 "hash": "section-1",
 "href": "https://www.example.org:5887/foo/bar?a=1&b=2#section-1",
 "requestUri": "/foo/bar?a=1&b=2"
}
{
 "protocol": "ftp:",
 "hostname": "www.files.com",
 "host": "www.files.com:22",
 "pathname": "/folder",
 "port": "22",
 "search": "?id=7",
 "hash": "",
 "href": "ftp://www.files.com:22/folder?id=7",
 "requestUri": "/folder?id=7"
}
share|improve this answer

Stop reinventing the wheel. Use https://github.com/medialize/URI.js/

var uri = new URI("http://example.org:80/foo/hello.html");
// get host
uri.host(); // returns string "example.org:80"
// set host
uri.host("example.org:80");
share|improve this answer

You don't need to create anything like a new URI, or createElement.

window.location; // => "http://example.com:3000/pathname/?search=test#hash"

returns the object you would want:

var loc = window.location;
loc.protocol; // => "http:"
loc.host;     // => "example.com:3000"
loc.hostname; // => "example.com"
loc.port;     // => "3000"
loc.pathname; // => "/pathname/"
loc.hash;     // => "#hash"
loc.search;   // => "?search=test"
share|improve this answer

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