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Summary

I need to retrieve attachments stored in a parent app from a link in a client of a child app. The attachments are available in the parent app via a web service call -- which returns a standard FileContentResult with content type "application/octet-stream". The best way I can think is to retrieve this via a WebRequest and pass the resulting response stream to a FileStreamResult, though I have some alternatives available.

Does anyone know if, when making a WebRequest, the response stream becomes available immediately once the first part of the response is returned or is it buffered so I don't get the response until all data has been retrieved?

Are there any other options than those listed in the full question below for doing this that I'm missing? (Other than keeping the attachments in both child and parent DBs -- I really don't want to do this since then I'd need to regularly synchronize them, too).

TLDR Version

I have two related applications which communicate through a RESTful web service. The parent application maintains a collection of entities which may have attachments. For example, a Request might have an Excel spreadsheet as an attachment. The entity and its attachment are stored in the database and access to the attachment is controlled using the same logic as access to the Request. That is, you should not be able to download an attachment if you cannot view the Request.

In the child application I maintain some integration glue for the entities assigned to a particular institution -- the app is used to communicate between our Board of Regents and each Regents school. I don't want to maintain and synchronize the full entity/attachment. I only want to maintain enough information to allow me to connect to the web service in the parent app and get the details for entities that the particular instance of the child application has access to.

This works well for the entity data itself. The amount of data is small and the overhead of buffering in the child application doesn't present a signficant delay in accessing the data. If necessary, I could cache the data locally to avoid performance penalities.

My concern is the attachments. I've considered three different mechanisms for providing access to the attachment from a client of the child application.

  1. Generate a one-time use token and associated url that allows the client to directly download the attachment from the parent application. The token generation web service call would ensure that users of the child application should have access to the attachment. The drawback to this is that you'd only be able to click on the link once in the client. Clicking again would result in an error rather than getting the attachment.

  2. Buffer the attachment in the child app. In this scenario I would provide a controller/action to download the attachment in the child app, then call a web service method to get the attachment and have the child app send the attachment as a FileContentResult. This removes the issue of only being able to click the link once, but the attachments could be reasonably large and buffering the data in the child application could potentially double the amount of time to download the attachment and, worse, incur a significant delay before the attachment download begins.

  3. Link in the child app, but provide the stream from the web service request directly to a FileStreamResult. This seems, to me, to be the best option as the FileStreamResult reads in chunks rather than having to have all the data available before it is sent to the client. The only drawback that I can see here is that I can no longer dispose of the WebResponse directly as the FileStreamResult won't be executed until after my action returns.

Here is what I have for the code for API wrapper code for (2) and (3):

private class ResponseModel<T> : IDisposable
{
    public T Model { get; set; }
    public WebResponse Response { get; set; }

    private bool Disposed { get; set; }
    private void Dispose( bool disposing )
    {
        if (!Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                ((IDisposable)this.Response).Dispose();
            }
            Disposed = true;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose( true );
    }
}

private ResponseModel<T> GetAttachmentResponse<T>( long id ) where T : IDownloadModel, new()
{
    var request = GetRequest( string.Format( "{0}/api/getattachment/{1}/{2}", this.BaseUrl, this.Key, id ) );

    var response = request.GetResponse();
    var model = (T)Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
    var contentDisposition = response.Headers["Content-Disposition"];
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty( contentDisposition ))
    {
        var filename = contentDisposition.Split( new[] { ';', ' ' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries )
                                         .SingleOrDefault( s => s.StartsWith( "filename", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase ) );
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty( filename ))
        {
            model.Name = filename.Split( '=' ).Skip( 1 ).FirstOrDefault();
        }
    }
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty( model.Name ))
    {
        model.Name = "untitled";
    }

    return new ResponseModel<T> { Model = model, Response = response };
}

public FileDownloadModel GetAttachment( long id )
{
    using (var response = GetAttachmentResponse<FileDownloadModel>( id ))
    {
        var reader = new BinaryReader( response.Response.GetResponseStream() );
        response.Model.Content = reader.ReadBytes( (int)response.Response.ContentLength );
        return response.Model;

    }
}

public FileStreamDownloadModel GetAttachmentStream( long id )
{
    // since we're returning the stream, we can't dispose of the response when done.
    var response = GetAttachmentResponse<FileStreamDownloadModel>( id );
    response.Model.Stream = response.Response.GetResponseStream();
    return response.Model;
}


public interface IDownloadModel
{
    string ContentType { get; }
    string Name { get; set; }
}

Model classes

public class FileDownloadModel : IDownloadModel
{
    public byte[] Content { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string ContentType { get { return "application/octet-stream"; } }
}

public class FileStreamDownloadModel : IDownloadModel
{
    public Stream Stream { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string ContentType { get { return "application/octet-stream"; } }
}
share|improve this question
    
Bueller? Bueller? All I'm getting is crickets on this one. –  tvanfosson Sep 14 '11 at 17:48

1 Answer 1

I would suggest a variant on Option 1 [call it Option 1(a)].

Instead of generating a one-time token, "borrow" the MVC AntiForgeryToken classes, and have your parent application return a custom token and cookie to the child app for inclusion in the form returned to the user.

If the child application may have links for multiple documents on a single page, in the request for the token information, have the child app submit a unique identifier (identifying the page request from the user) as part of the request. You can then use this identifier in generating the tokens, and you can store the identifier as part of the verification process. This will give you a multi-use token, unique for each link on the page.

Slap an expiration time on the unique identifier, and you should be good to go.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of using an expiration date instead of making it a one-time only token. Do you have any suggestions on how to handle the use case of someone sharing the link with someone else? Assume that the latter person is authorized to use the application and use the link. I'm not trying to solve the problem of an authorized person sharing the attachment with an unauthorized person; once they download it I assume they don't share it inappropriately, but they may want to share the link with an authorized person instead. –  tvanfosson Sep 17 '11 at 17:33
    
If the link token is based on the AntiForgeryToken class, then it cannot be shared, since it requires the cookie for authentication. If authorized users are allowed to share links, then just convert your single use token to an expiring token. However, rather than allowing links to be shared, I would prefer to give users the ability to share a link to the page with the download links, since that reinforces your security model. –  counsellorben Sep 17 '11 at 21:50

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