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I have a property within my class that I would expect to set itself when a new instance of the class is created, but it doesn't, why?

public class RecurlyData
    {
        private readonly string _accountCode;

        //Default constructor
        public RecurlyData(int accountCode)
        {
            _accountCode = accountCode.ToString();
        }

        public RecurlyAccount Account { get { return GetAccount(); } }

        private RecurlyAccount GetAccount()
        {
            var account = RecurlyAccount.Get(_accountCode);
            account.BillingInfo = RecurlyBillingInfo.Get(account.AccountCode);

            return account;
        }
    }  

I am calling it like this:

private List<RecurlyData> _recurlyData;  
    _recurlyData.Add(new RecurlyData(1079));
share|improve this question
1  
What exactly is going wrong? What do you expect vs. what are you seeing? –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 17:36
    
I want the property Account to be set, currently nothing after the default constructor is being evaluated. –  The Muffin Man Sep 9 '11 at 17:42
    
Are you calling the constructor that takes an accountCode? If you are, then the property (I am assuming you mean the _accountCode field) is going to be set to the stringized version of the accountCode you specify, otherwise it will be null. –  pstrjds Sep 9 '11 at 17:44
1  
Account returns a dynamically created value. You are calling the GetAccount method in the getter. –  pstrjds Sep 9 '11 at 17:45
    
@Nick "currently nothing" means what exactly? It can't be a null reference or you would be seeing an exception when you accessed the Account property. If it's just getting wrong data, the fault is most likely in your repository classes. –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 17:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe what you are expecting to happen is that GetAccount(); will be called when the object is constructed.

That is not how properties work.

A property's getter acts just like a method, so in fact your property

public RecurlyAccount Account { get { return GetAccount(); } }

Does the exact same thing as the GetAccount method.

Calling:

var myAccount = this.Account;

Is 100% identical to:

var myAccount = this.GetAccount();

If that method causes some visible side-effects (which I imagine it does, otherwise it wouldn't matter whether it gets called in the constructor or not) then it most likely should not be in a get property.

Every time that Account is accessed, the method will get called, so saying:

var data = new RecurlyData(1079);
var account = data.Account;
var account2 = data.Account;

The method GetAccount was called twice. The value isn't saved unless you write code to save it somewhere.

@pstrjds's answer should give you the behaviour you want, but as a slight alternative, if you don't like needing that private backing field, you can also write:

public class RecurlyData
{
    private readonly string _accountCode;

    public RecurlyData(int accountCode)
    {
        _accountCode = accountCode.ToString();
        Account = GetAccount(_accountCode);
    }

    public RecurlyAccount Account { get; private set; }

    private static RecurlyAccount GetAccount(string accountCode)
    {
        var account = RecurlyAccount.Get(accountCode);
        account.BillingInfo = RecurlyBillingInfo.Get(account.AccountCode);

        return account;
    }
}  

The result is almost exactly the same, with the exception that it's only private and not readonly so you could set it from somewhere other than the constructor. I do personally find it cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting, I didn't realize it would recall it. That explains why I was having issues. –  The Muffin Man Sep 9 '11 at 18:05
    
@Nick I edited in some more examples. If your property only has a get and no set then other than leaving out the () it behaves exactly like a method. –  Davy8 Sep 9 '11 at 18:09
    
@pstrdjs's answer should give you the desired behaviour. I'm just explaining how properties work. –  Davy8 Sep 9 '11 at 18:11
    
@nick As a side note, the term "default constructor" generally refers to one without any parameters, so the comment is actually inaccurate. –  Davy8 Sep 9 '11 at 18:17
1  
@Davy - it still has a "private backing field", its just compiler generated ;) –  pstrjds Sep 9 '11 at 19:07

This should take care of creating the Account for you:

public class RecurlyData
{
    private readonly string _accountCode;
    private readonly RecurlyAccount _account;

    //Default constructor
    public RecurlyData(int accountCode)
    {
        _accountCode = accountCode.ToString();
        _account = GetAccount(_accountCode);
    }

    public RecurlyAccount Account { get { return _account; } }

    private static RecurlyAccount GetAccount(string accountCode)
    {
        var account = RecurlyAccount.Get(accountCode);
        account.BillingInfo = RecurlyBillingInfo.Get(account.AccountCode);

        return account;
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
This works, however it looks like all that happened is my property is pulling it's value from a field rather than the method, i'm failing to see why one works and the other doesn't. –  The Muffin Man Sep 9 '11 at 17:59
    
@nick I believe you have a misunderstanding of how properties work. See my answer for an explanation. –  Davy8 Sep 9 '11 at 18:03
    
From your question, it seems that this code is what you want, you want the Account to be created by the constructor so that when you access it's property it does not change. That is what this code is doing. (see @Davy8's answer for an explanation of what a properties getter does). –  pstrjds Sep 9 '11 at 18:06

readonly seems to be the one to be blamed. private is enough to protect the data from being modified.

EDIT: Nevermind, readonly has nothing to do.

share|improve this answer
    
still get the same result –  The Muffin Man Sep 9 '11 at 17:42
    
Can you update your question with a sample code of how are you instantiating this class? –  Joel Alejandro Sep 9 '11 at 17:43
1  
Blaming this on readonly doesn't make any sense –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 17:44
    
@Paul Equis - how so? If a field is defined readonly, it can't be expected to accept a value, AFAIK. –  Joel Alejandro Sep 9 '11 at 17:46
    
It doesn't matter because nowhere is the OP trying to write to the field declared readonly, besides the initial assignment. –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 17:47

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