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This simple question is buzzering me. Are getters the same for

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *name
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *name 

- (NSString*) name{
    return name;    
}
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, as the other answers state, the getters are the same. The options retain, copy, and assign determine how to generate setters, but not the names even of those.

If you want to use a different getter name, for instance if you have a BOOL such as the UIApplication property idleTimerDisabled, then you do this by specifically assigned the getter name:

@property(nonatomic, getter=isIdleTimerDisabled) BOOL idleTimerDisabled

Without an override such as this, the getter name is always the property name.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:40
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According to the documentation

A property declaration, however, provides additional information about how the accessor methods are implemented (as described in “Property Declaration Attributes”).

Both the getter and the setter behavior are defined by property declarations. In your example that is correct since it is defined nonatomic but if nonatomic were missing from the declaration it would would be implemented similar to this

- (NSString*) name{
    [_internal lock]; // lock using an object-level lock
    id result = [[name retain] autorelease];
    [_internal unlock];
    return result;
}

This of course is only true if you use @synthesize and do not override or change the getter and setter methods.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:41
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Yes, they are the same. retain, copy, and assign only give the compiler instructions on how to generate setters, not getters.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:41
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Yes, copy and retain only affect the setter and not the getter. On a side note, you should chose copy instead of retain for immutable objects like NSString.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:41
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If you're using ARC (Automated Reference Counting), then the getters should all look like what you have above. However, the new standard with ARC is to use strong and weak instead of retain and assign, respectively. retain and assign will still work and are synonymous with the strong and weak, but any newly generated files will use those words instead, so it's important to understand what they mean.

If you aren't using ARC (still an option, even in iOS 5 and Lion) getters can be different depending on retain, copy, or assign.

retain and copy both look like:

- (NSString *)name {
    return [[name retain] autorelease];
}

assign is pretty basic, but is usually used more for weak references (like delegates):

- (id)delegate {
    return delegate;
}

I went into some detail on this because it's important to understand when using ARC, the code for all 3 look the same, but the behavior is still very much like what's written above. If you're using atomic instead of nonatomic then you need to add some locking/unlocking lines to make the method thread-safe. In any case, it's generally better to use the default accessors generated with @synthesize unless you want to do something really tricky.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:40
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Yes, they are. The getter name dependce only of properties name.

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Thank you for the answer! –  Michael Sep 9 '11 at 23:41
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