Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have this method:

public StreamReader GetResourceStream(string filename)
{
    using (Stream stream = this.GetType().Assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(filename))
    using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        return sr;
    }
}

When I call it, should I call it this way

StreamReader resource = GetResourceStream("blah.xml");

or this way:

using (StreamReader resource = GetResourceStream("blah.xml"))
{
    // Do stuff
}

If second way, does this means the using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(stream)) line is not making any difference by using a using statement?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It doesn't really make sense to have the GetResourceStream method put the using statement around the object it's returning. That means you will be returning an object in a disposed state, and what good is that? It will throw ObjectDisposed exceptions at you.

So remove the using statements inside your factory method, and apply the using statement where you're actually using it.

It should look more like this:

public StreamReader GetResourceStream(string filename)
{
    Stream stream = this.GetType().Assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(filename);
    return new StreamReader(stream)        
}
share|improve this answer
    
You mean both using inside GetResourceStream or just the second one? –  Ahmet Sep 9 '11 at 22:56
    
@Ahmet Both of them –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 22:57
    
I can see by Jon's code that I don't need to use a Stream but I can create a StreamReader directly, but I'm curious now, If I'd use your code above, who would dispose the Stream stream object (not the StreamReader; now I understand I'd dispose that one from the caller code? –  Ahmet Sep 9 '11 at 23:00
1  
@Ahmet Both code samples do create a Stream. The StreamReader presumably calls dispose on the underlying stream when it is disposed too, although I haven't found documentation showing that yet. –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 23:02
1  
@Ahmet A quick experiment in linqpad shows that this is the case. The StreamReader disposes of the underlying Stream. –  Paul Phillips Sep 9 '11 at 23:10

You should change the method itself not to include a using statement, but then make sure that the calling code uses a using statement:

public StreamReader GetResourceStream(string filename)
{
    return new StreamReader(GetType().Assembly
                                     .GetManifestResourceStream(filename));
}

using (StreamReader resource = GetResourceStream("blah.xml"))
{
    // Do stuff
}

That way it will only dispose of the resource when you've actually used it. Basically the method is giving ownership of the returned resource to the caller. That much isn't too bad - it's reasonably common, even (think of File.OpenText etc).

Where it gets more tricky is when you pass a resource into a method or constructor - should the "called" code take ownership or not? Usually not, but occasionally it's appropriate - for example, the Bitmap(Stream) documentation states that you must keep the stream alive for as long as the bitmap is required. In fact, disposing of the bitmap also disposes of the stream, so you still only have one resource to keep track of... but you do need to know that you mustn't close the stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Per your code, I understand you don't need to create a Stream in the middle as I did but just create a StreamReader directly, but I'm curious, how would you do if you'd need to create a Stream and pass it to the constructor of StreamReader? (There are case AFAIK where you need to create an intermediary stream). –  Ahmet Sep 9 '11 at 23:05
    
@Ahmet: I'd just create a stream as normal - and trust that there'd be no exceptions between creating it and passing it to the StreamReader. If you were paranoid you could always create a finally block and dispose the stream only if we hadn't reached the StreamReader constructor, or something like that. –  Jon Skeet Sep 9 '11 at 23:07
    
@Ahmet: Note that my code creates the same number of streams as yours - it just doesn't use a separate local variable for the stream it creates. –  Jon Skeet Sep 9 '11 at 23:08

When program flow exits the second using block, sr.Dispose() will be called, disposing the StreamReader and making it useless.

You need to make use of sr before flow control exits that block.

share|improve this answer
    
So my GetResourceStream method should not use the 2nd using if I understand correctly? –  Ahmet Sep 9 '11 at 22:55
    
@Ahmet: You need to dispose of the resource somewhere, but if you're going to return sr, you need to dispose of it where you use it and not wrap it in a using block there. –  Eric J. Sep 9 '11 at 22:58
    
@Ahmet: Added an example of what I mean to the response. –  Eric J. Sep 9 '11 at 23:00
    
All variations shown are broken. You're returning a dangling StreamReader, the underlying Stream has already been closed. –  Ben Voigt Sep 9 '11 at 23:02
    
@Ben: Yeah just noticed. Back to my original suggestion... use sr in the original using block. –  Eric J. Sep 9 '11 at 23:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.