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The following query works on MySQL Query Analyzer and PHP but fails in Python:

update home_recipient 
    set 
        process = 'PROCESS_ID', processed_on = current_timestamp
    where 
        sent_on is null or  
        timestampdiff(minute, processed_on, current_timestamp) > 60
    order by id limit 45

The error displayed is "You can't specify target table 'home_recipient' for update in FROM clause"

I'm using Python 2.7 and MySQL_python-1.2.3-py2.7.egg

The error seems to be generated by Python's driver because que query works everywhere else.

Is there a way to tell MySQL_python to stop interpreting the query and pass it "as is" to MySQL?

EDIT: This is the code that executes the query.

sql = """update home_recipient set process = 'PROCESS_ID', processed_on = current_timestamp
    where sent_on is null or timestampdiff(minute, processed_on, current_timestamp) > 60
    order by id limit 45"""
cursor = connection.cursor()
cursor.execute(sql)

OK. This is getting ridiculous. Even removing everything else from the update shows the same error:

sql = """update home_recipient set process = 'PROCESS_ID', processed_on = current_timestamp"""
cursor = connection.cursor()
cursor.execute(sql)

Any help?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What's the Python code that send this query? –  Vincent Savard Sep 9 '11 at 23:21
    
You should provide more information to this question. What is the python code being executed. –  Eduardo Sep 9 '11 at 23:22

1 Answer 1

The three " are the problem

""" This is a string for documentation"""

http://docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html

curs.execute("update home_recipient set process = 'PROCESS_ID', processed_on = current_timestamp where sent_on is null or timestampdiff(minute, processed_on, current_timestamp) > 60 order by id limit 45")

If PROCESS_ID is a variable:

curs.execute( 'update home_recipient set process=:PROCESS_ID, processed_on = current_timestamp where sent_on is null or timestampdiff(minute, processed_on, current_timestamp) > 60 order by id limit 45', [PROCESS_ID])
share|improve this answer
    
-1 FIRSTLY, the three double-quotes are NOT the problem. They are just another way of delimiting string constants. That is NOT a comment. Comments start with #, and are ignored. A doc-string is just a string (delimited however you like) at the start of (e.g.) a function/method, and is NOT ignored. If the text inside the """ quotes was being ignored, how come the table name gets mentioned in the error message?? SECONDLY, you should NOT do your own quoting when substituting parameters. See this link: bobby-tables.com –  John Machin Sep 10 '11 at 7:33
    
Thanks John, I will use this notation. I remember a similar method in delphi. –  Patagonikus Sep 10 '11 at 14:48

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