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Is it possible to see if a web service uses SOAP 1.1 or 1.2, based on the information in the WSDL?

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4 Answers 4

Yes you can usually see what SOAP version is supported based on the WSDL.

Take a look at Demo web service WSDL. It has a reference to the soap12 namespace indicating it supports SOAP 1.2. If that was absent then you'd probably be safe assuming the service only supported SOAP 1.1.

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The soap12 namespace reference is a good indicator. But if it is missing, it still can be a SOAP 1.2 web service - the example WSDL at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Services_Description_Language als does not have this reference, but maybe it contains something else which is typical for SOAP 1.2? –  mjn Apr 10 '09 at 6:41

I have found this page

http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap12/soap12WSDL.htm

which says that Soap 1.2 uses the new namespace http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap12/

It is in the 'WSDL 1.1 Binding extension for SOAP 1.1'.

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Found transport-attribute in binding-element which tells us that this is the WSDL 1.1 binding for the SOAP 1.1 HTTP binding.

ex.

<wsdlsoap:binding style="document" transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http"/>
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SOAP 1.1 uses namespace http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/

SOAP 1.2 uses namespace http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap12/

The wsdl is able to define operations under soap 1.1 and soap 1.2 at the same time in the same wsdl. Thats useful if you need to evolve your wsdl to support new functionality that requires soap 1.2 (eg. MTOM), in this case you dont need to create a new service but just evolve the original one.

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