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If I have a ConcurrentQueue, is there a preferred way to consume it with a Linq statement? It doesn't have a method to dequeue all the items as a sequence, and it's enumerator doesn't remove items.

I'm doing batch consumption, meaning periodically I want to process the queue and empty it, instead of processing it until it is empty and blocking until more items are enqueued. BlockingCollection doesn't seem like it will work because it will block when it gets to the last item, and I want that thread to do other stuff, like clear other queues.

static ConcurrentQueue<int> MyQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<int>();
void Main()
{
    MyQueue.Enqueue(1);MyQueue.Enqueue(2);MyQueue.Enqueue(3);MyQueue.Enqueue(4);MyQueue.Enqueue(5);

    var lst = MyQueue.ToLookup(x => x.SomeProperty);
    //queue still has all elements
    MyQueue.Dump("queue");  
}

For now, I've made a helper method

static IEnumerable<T> ReadAndEmptyQueue<T>(this ConcurrentQueue<T> q)
{
    T item;
    while(q.TryDequeue(out item))
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}

var lk = MyQueue.ReadAndEmptyQueue().ToLookup(x => x.SomeProperty);
MyQueue.Dump(); //size is now zero

Is there a better way, or am I doing it right?

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Looks good to me. There are no other methods on ConcurrentQueue to dequeue other than TryDequeue. Your extension method looks like the right way to make it LINQable. –  Adam Jones Sep 9 '11 at 23:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach is very reasonable, in my opinion. Allowing a consumer to empty the queue in this fashion is clean and simple.

BlockingCollection doesn't seem like it will work because it will block when it gets to the last item, and I want that thread to do other stuff, like clear other queues.

The one thing I'd mention - sometimes, from a design standpoint, it's easier to just fire off a separate consumer thread per queue. If you do that, each BlockingCollection<T> can just use GetConsumingEnumerable() and block as needed, as they'll be in a wait state when the queue is empty.

This is the approach I take more frequently, as it's often much simpler from a synchronization standpoint if each collection has one or more dedicated consumers, instead of a consumer switching between what it's consuming.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, I agree the usual approach is much simpler, but I'm doing this in a website so I want to limit the number of worker threads I use. –  dan Sep 9 '11 at 23:39
    
@dan: then your current approach is quite nice. It seems fairly elegant if you're trying not to use up any extra threads. –  Reed Copsey Sep 9 '11 at 23:41

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