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I have some code that sends multiple ASIHTTPRequests to upload and download data in a view controller. When the view controller gets dealloc'd it should clean up all unfinished requests by setting the delegate to nil.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
        // send multiple requests
        [self sendRequest:someURL];
        [self sendRequest:someURL];
        [self sendRequest:someURL];
        [self sendRequest:someURL];
}

- (void)sendRequest:(NSString*)url
{
        ASIHTTPRequest *request = [ASIHTTPRequest requestWithURL:url];
        [request setDelegate:self]; 

        ASINetworkQueue *requestQueue = [ASINetworkQueue queue];
        [requestQueue setMaxConcurrentOperationCount:2];
        [requestQueue setDelegate:self];
        [requestQueue addOperation:request];
        [requestQueue go];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    NSLog(@"cancel all operations");
    for (ASIHTTPRequest *req in ASIHTTPRequest.sharedQueue.operations)
    {
        [req cancel];
        [req setDelegate:nil];
    }

    [super dealloc];
}

However, if I pop this view controller before all operations have finished, I get a "message sent to deallocated instance" in ASIHTTPRequest.m complaining that the delegate went away in the code below.

/* ALWAYS CALLED ON MAIN THREAD! */
- (void)reportFailure
{
    ***crash here --> if (delegate && [delegate respondsToSelector:didFailSelector]) {
        [delegate performSelector:didFailSelector withObject:self];
    }
    if (queue && [queue respondsToSelector:@selector(requestFailed:)]) {
        [queue performSelector:@selector(requestFailed:) withObject:self];
    }
    #if NS_BLOCKS_AVAILABLE
    if(failureBlock){
        failureBlock();
    }
    #endif
}

How can I work around this?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're creating a new queue for each request around this line of code:

ASINetworkQueue *requestQueue = [ASINetworkQueue queue];

So the loop here won't loop over the requests as it's looping over the sharedQueue, not the new one(s) you've created:

for (ASIHTTPRequest *req in ASIHTTPRequest.sharedQueue.operations)

Requests would only get added to the sharedQueue if you use [request startAynchronous] without explicitly setting a different queue.

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Is there a way to loop over operations from within the requestQueue I created if I retained it? –  Jiho Kang Sep 10 '11 at 11:37
1  
Yes, use change the 'ASIHTTPRequest.sharedQueue' to the queue you want to iterate over. –  JosephH Sep 10 '11 at 13:32
    
Thanks! very awesome –  Jiho Kang Sep 11 '11 at 10:18
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I may be missing something, but I think waiting until dealloc is too late, you want to cancel your operations on viewWillDisappear or viewDidUnload

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Thanks for the input but doesn't viewDidUnload only get called when a memory warning was received? Also, I'd like to run the operations as long as the view controller exists on memory and only clean up just before the view controller gets destroyed. –  Jiho Kang Sep 10 '11 at 0:48
    
Not "only when" that's just the easiest way to get it to happen. I still don't see how that does not apply, that sounds like what you want to me. –  slf Sep 10 '11 at 0:56
    
In other words, if you are sending requests on viewDidLoad, then you would want to cancel them on viewDidUnload to balance it out, otherwise you'll get another viewDidLoad and you'll have more requests go out –  slf Sep 10 '11 at 0:58
    
Ok, so it does work if I cancel operations before I call popViewControllerAnimated:. This leads me to another question though, does the view controller always get dealloc'd if it's popped from the nav controller? I thought that wasn't the case which is why I wanted operations to continue running even after the view has disappeared just as long as the view controller is alive in memory. –  Jiho Kang Sep 10 '11 at 1:04
    
I'm always very hesitant to say always whenever I'm talking about run-time stuff, but it's highly probable :) –  slf Sep 10 '11 at 1:09
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