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I have been relying on the misconception that static variables defined in member functions were limited to the specific class instance.

To illustrate my misconception:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Simple {
    template<typename T>
    T & Test(const T & Value) {
        static T Storage = Value;
        return Storage;
    }
};

int main() {
    Simple A;
    Simple B;

    std::string Foo = A.Test(std::string("Foo"));
    std::string Bar = B.Test(std::string("Bar"));

    std::cout << Foo << ' ' << Bar << std::endl;
}

The behavior I expected would have resulted in the output of

Foo Bar

Is there a simple alternative that would result in the behavior I expected?

Edit

A cutdown version of the class that has the issue:

class SignalManager {
    private:
        template<typename T> struct FunctionPointer { typedef boost::function1<void, const T &> type; };
        template<typename T> struct Array { typedef std::vector<typename FunctionPointer<T>::type> type; };

        template<typename T>
        typename Array<T>::type & GetArray() {
            static typename Array<T>::type Array;
            return Array;
        }

    public:
        template<typename T, typename M>
        void Broadcast(const M & Value) {
            typename Array<T>::type::iterator Iterator;
            for(Iterator = GetArray<T>().begin(); Iterator != GetArray<T>().end(); ++Iterator) {
                (*Iterator)(Value);
            }
        }

        template<typename T, typename F>
        void Connect(const F & Function) {
            GetArray<T>().push_back(Function);
        }
};
share|improve this question
    
it isn't at all clear what it is you are trying to accomplish. If you remove static or perform an assigned right after your static variable declaration (as suggested by Mahesh), they'll both give you the expected output. –  greatwolf Sep 10 '11 at 4:51
    
@Victor In the code sample I am misusing static to generate anonymous member variables at compile time. Subsequent calls to GetArray would return a refrence to the anonymous member variable. –  Timesquare Sep 10 '11 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand your confusion, the alternative is member variables...

template<typename T>
struct Simple {
    T storage;

    T & Test(const T & Value) {
        storage = Value;
        return Storage;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I am using the static variable to store data for the class, so I can look up type int and retrieve whatever I have stored there. –  Timesquare Sep 10 '11 at 2:54
    
That's more of a design limitation of your system. For that, you need to put data into a type-less field and store some sort of identifier with it and use that to get your data back. End humble opinion. –  Andrew White Sep 10 '11 at 2:58
static T Storage = Value;

The above statement gets executed only once despite multiple calls to member function Test. So, instead separate the declaration and initialization.

template<typename T>
T & Test(const T & Value) {         
     static T Storage;
     Storage = Value;   // Now, this is guaranteed to execute during member function calls.
    return Storage;
}

This should get what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
But storage is still static so the next class instance to execute it still overrides the value, right? –  Andrew White Sep 10 '11 at 3:01
    
Yes, you are correct. If each instance requires it's own variable, then there is no point for OP to declare it as static at all. –  Mahesh Sep 10 '11 at 3:12

You could just make it into a regular, non-static class variable, although this would require the class to be a template instead of the function...

template<typename T>
struct Simple
{
    T& Test( const T& value )
    {
        storage = value;
        return storage;
    }
private:
    T storage;
}
share|improve this answer

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