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I am working on a project for school and I am not sure if the way I am trying to solve it is even possible. The project involves making a program, forking off 2 children which then have to replace their pid's with other programs, and having the 2 children talk thru a pipe by use of read() and write().

The question I have is with using execve and passing the pipe thru to that child. What I have right now is this:

Parent Program - forking and having the child call execve:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define BUF_SIZE 16

/*  2 cmd line arguments
    1. file already in system (to be copied)
    2. file to be created (the copy)
create pipe (for communication) + 2 child processes
    first child replace pid with reader
    second child with writer
    wait for both children to terminate before exiting
*/

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

//making the pipe
int pfd[2];
pipe(pfd);

int num_dead;

//forking
pid_t reader_child_pid;
pid_t writer_child_pid;
pid_t child_pid;

//args for each fork
char *args_1[] = {argv[1], (char *) 0};
char *args_2[] = {argv[2], (char *) 0};

switch(writer_child_pid = fork()) {
    case -1:
        perror("fork failed");
        return 1;
    case 0:
        close(pfd[1]);
        dup2(pfd[0], 0);
        execve("./writer", args_2, NULL);
        perror("execve failed");
        break;
    default:
        switch(reader_child_pid = fork()) {
            case -1:
                perror("2nd fork failed");
                return 1;
            case 0:
                close(pfd[0]);
                dup2(pfd[1], 1);
                execve("./reader", args_1, NULL);
                perror("execve failed");
                break;
            default:
                //close(pfd[0]);
                //close(pfd[1]);
                break;
        }
}

num_dead = 0;

for(;;) {
    if((child_pid=wait(NULL)) == -1){
        if(errno == ECHILD) {
            printf("NO MORE CHILDREN");
            exit(0);
        } else {
            perror("wait error");
            exit(1);
        }
    }
    ++num_dead;
    printf("wait() returned 1 child");
}
}

Trying to use dup2 to redirect to stdin and stdout. Then in the children I try to read and write to the stdout and stdin like so:

Child - reading data from stdin

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define BUF_SIZE 16
int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
printf("\n\nWRITER\n");

    /* ready to process info
    read the file, write it to pipe */
int wri_inFile = open(argv[0], O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC | S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR);

char buf[BUF_SIZE];
int read_test;
for(;;) {
    read_test = read(0, buf, BUF_SIZE);
    if(read_test == 0) //eof
        break;
    write(wri_inFile, buf, BUF_SIZE);
}

close(wri_inFile);
exit(0);
}

I am using dup as per your suggestions, but I am not sure I am doing it accesing the stdin and stdout like I should be.

--Here is the other child just for reference

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define BUF_SIZE 16

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

printf("\n\nREADER\n");

/* ready to process info
    read the file, write it to pipe */
printf("FILE::%s", argv[0]);
int inFile = open(argv[0], O_RDONLY);

char buf[BUF_SIZE];
int read_test;
for(;;) {
    read_test = read(inFile, buf, BUF_SIZE);
    if(read_test == 0) //eof
        break;
    write(1, buf, BUF_SIZE);
}
close(argv[0][1]);
close(inFile);
printf("\nDONE WITH READER\n");
exit(0);
}

--If it makes any difference, it seems like the other child (the one writing to the pipe) is successfully writing to it, but the above child never reads from the pipe and the outFile from above is always empty.

**still the same thing happening

I am not looking for you to solve the problem for me, I just am really stuck and don't know if I am doing something extremely wrong. Thanks again for any and all help.

I am actively searching for examples to work from, but I can't find any that show the code from the children that they exec into which is where my problem appears to be now.

share|improve this question
    
you aren't actually creating a pipe here .. you need to use the pipe system call or make a fifo. see pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/pipe.html The general idiom is to create pipe, then fork, then close one end of the pipe in each process (close the read side on the write thread and vice versa). Then you need to perform a dup to force stdin/stdout to use the pipe. Finally, the reader/writer should be reading and writing from stdin/stdout. –  Foo Bah Sep 10 '11 at 2:50
    
I didn't include all the code or the parent program: //making the pipe int pfd[2]; pipe(pfd); That is where I make the pipe. Also, I am closing the one end of the pipe before the execve calls, is that incorrect? One of the limitation of the problem assigned to me is to use the read() and write() functions to handle reading and writing to the pipe and treat the pipe as if it only has a buffer size of 16 bytes. That is why I am using the read() and write() functions. Is this possible or am I understanding the problem wrong? –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 3:02
    
Your child programs should be reading from stdin and writing to stdout. The parent, which performed the fork, should be using dup before exec in order to set the stdin of the reader to the read handle of the pipe (and set the stdout of the writer to the pipe). Children don't care about the fact that it was a pipe. –  Foo Bah Sep 10 '11 at 3:50
    
If you end up with one child reading from the pipe on its stdin and the other writing to the pipe on its stdout, then both children end up closing both the file descriptors returned by pipe(); your dup2() (or dup()) calls create copies (duplicates) of the relevant pipe descriptors. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '11 at 4:01
    
I edited my code from all 3 different files with the use of dup2 to close and redirect pipes to stdin and stdout. What I am unsure of is if I am correctly using the read() and write() functions in the children now. It still appears to be hanging and creating an empty file. Thanks for the help so far, and I'm sorry if I'm not understanding something that should be really simple. –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 4:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When using pipes, it is imperative to make sure that the processes are not keeping pipes open (unless the process is actually using the pipe). In particular, in this context, the parent process must close both ends of the pipe because otherwise the reader will never get an EOF indication.

After more careful reading of the other two programs, I see that the reader program reads the file it is given and writes that content to the pipe, and the writer program writes the file it is given with the data that it reads from the pipe.

This code is about the minimum changes that will work:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/*  2 cmd line arguments
    1. file already in system (to be copied)
    2. file to be created (the copy)
create pipe (for communication) + 2 child processes
    first child replace pid with reader
    second child with writer
    wait for both children to terminate before exiting
*/

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //making the pipe
    int pfd[2];
    pipe(pfd);      // Error check omitted!
    int num_dead;

    //forking
    pid_t reader_child_pid;
    pid_t writer_child_pid;
    pid_t child_pid;

    if (argc != 3)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s infile outfile\n", argv[0]);
        return 1;
    }

    //args for each fork
    char *args_1[] = { "reader", argv[1], (char *) 0 };
    char *args_2[] = { "writer", argv[2], (char *) 0 };

    switch (writer_child_pid = fork()) {
        case -1:
            perror("fork failed");
            return 1;

        case 0:
            // writer reads from standard input (pipe) and writes to named file
            dup2(pfd[0], 0);  // Error check omitted
            close(pfd[0]);
            close(pfd[1]);
            execve("./writer", args_2, NULL);
            perror("execve failed");
            return 1;

        default:
            switch (reader_child_pid = fork()) {
            case -1:
                perror("2nd fork failed");
                return 1;

            case 0:
                //reader reads from the named file and writes to the pipe
                dup2(pfd[1], 1);
                close(pfd[0]);
                close(pfd[1]);
                execve("./reader", args_1, NULL);
                perror("execve failed");
                return 1;

            default:
                // The parent closes both ends of the pipe
                close(pfd[0]);
                close(pfd[1]);
                break;
        }
    }

    num_dead = 0;

    for(;;) {
        if ((child_pid = wait(NULL)) == -1){
            if (errno == ECHILD) {
                printf("NO MORE CHILDREN\n");
                exit(0);
            } else {
                perror("wait error");
                exit(1);
            }
        }
        ++num_dead;
        printf("wait() returned 1 child (%d)\n", (int)child_pid);
    }
    return(0);
}

Note that each child and the parent close both the pipe file descriptors before completing their work.

I would probably not use nested switches for the flow of control, and I would probably use functions to handle the processing of each child:

if ((child1 = fork()) == -1)
    ...error...
else if (child1 == 0)
    launch_reader(pfd, args_1);
else if ((child2 = fork()) == -1)
    ...error...
else if (child2 == 0)
    launch_writer(pfd, args_2);

...parent...

I would also have a function to encapsulate 'report error and exit', even if it was only two lines long. Also, make sure that messages from printf() end with a newline if you actually want them to appear timely.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your input. I plan on cleaning up my code with your suggestions after I get it working as intending. I really appreciate you taking the time to type it all out and show me what I was doing wrong. –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 5:07
    
Incidentally, the open() call in your writer is faulty; you should put the permissions bits into a third argument: int wri_inFile = open(argv[0], O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR); –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '11 at 5:37
    
I actually noticed that, but thank you for pointing it out. I have almost completely finished implementing all of your recommendations for making my code more readable/better implemented. It has helped make me realize what is actually going on more easily. Thanks again. –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 6:01

I marked the problem below.

switch(reader_child_pid = fork()) {
    // ...
    default:
        close(pfd[1]); // <--------------------
        close(pfd[0]);
        switch(writer_child_pid = fork()) {
            // ...
            default:
                break;
        }
}

Here, before forking the second child, you close both ends of the pipe in the parent. Therefore, both ends are closed in the second child process also. You should move those close statements to the second default block so that they will be closed after the second child is forked.

switch(reader_child_pid = fork()) {
    // ...
    default:
        switch(writer_child_pid = fork()) {
            // ...
            default:
                close(pfd[1]);
                close(pfd[0]);
                break;
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My code no longer locks up and actually copies the file as intended, however it also copies a few lines of extra text to the file from the printf statements inside the reader function. However, if i remove those uneccessary printf statements (the one that says "FILE::%s", argv[0] namely) the program freaks out and doesn't work at all. I think I know why this happens, at the bottom of my writer, when i close the file, I believe it is picking up those extra characters from the print statements left in the buffer. Removing the printf's still break the program though. –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 4:58
    
I'm sorry, everything is working correctly. I must have not save the file or not compiled the new saved file somewhere in there. Thank you very much for your help. –  forTruce Sep 10 '11 at 5:05

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