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Given a counted string (either an array of characters, or a wrapper like std::string), is there a "proper" way to escape and/or unescape it in C or C++, such that "special" characters (like the null character) become C-style-escaped and "normal" characters stay the way they are?

Or do I have to do it by hand?

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So you're looking for some sort of STL function that converts "\n" into "\\n" runtime? –  muntoo Sep 10 '11 at 3:07
    
@muntoo: Yup, exactly (and vice-versa). It could be C though -- it doesn't have to be a part of STL (C++). –  Mehrdad Sep 10 '11 at 3:08
    
Do you want the sequence: 0 65 66 67 to appear as the text "\0ABC"? –  Marlon Sep 10 '11 at 3:09
    
Do you want it to convert the characters into something C would understand or just add backslashes before special characters? –  icktoofay Sep 10 '11 at 3:09
1  
What is your goal here? Are you dynamically generating C code? –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 10 '11 at 3:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a function to process a single character:

/*
** Does not generate hex character constants.
** Always generates triple-digit octal constants.
** Always generates escapes in preference to octal.
** Escape question mark to ensure no trigraphs are generated by repetitive use.
** Handling of 0x80..0xFF is locale-dependent (might be octal, might be literal).
*/

void chr_cstrlit(unsigned char u, char *buffer, size_t buflen)
{
    if (buflen < 2)
        *buffer = '\0';
    else if (isprint(u) && u != '\'' && u != '\"' && u != '\\' && u != '\?')
        sprintf(buffer, "%c", u);
    else if (buflen < 3)
        *buffer = '\0';
    else
    {
        switch (u)
        {
        case '\a':  strcpy(buffer, "\\a"); break;
        case '\b':  strcpy(buffer, "\\b"); break;
        case '\f':  strcpy(buffer, "\\f"); break;
        case '\n':  strcpy(buffer, "\\n"); break;
        case '\r':  strcpy(buffer, "\\r"); break;
        case '\t':  strcpy(buffer, "\\t"); break;
        case '\v':  strcpy(buffer, "\\v"); break;
        case '\\':  strcpy(buffer, "\\\\"); break;
        case '\'':  strcpy(buffer, "\\'"); break;
        case '\"':  strcpy(buffer, "\\\""); break;
        case '\?':  strcpy(buffer, "\\\?"); break;
        default:
            if (buflen < 5)
                *buffer = '\0';
            else
                sprintf(buffer, "\\%03o", u);
            break;
        }
    }
}

And this is the code to handle a null-terminated string (using the function above):

void str_cstrlit(const char *str, char *buffer, size_t buflen)
{
    unsigned char u;
    size_t len;

    while ((u = (unsigned char)*str++) != '\0')
    {
        chr_cstrlit(u, buffer, buflen);
        if ((len = strlen(buffer)) == 0)
            return;
        buffer += len;
        buflen -= len;
    }
}
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1  
I could've implemented it myself as well, but I was hoping that there would be a standardized solution of some sort. But I guess there isn't... +1 thanks anyway. –  Mehrdad Sep 11 '11 at 4:35
    
I'm sure you could; I'm sure I'm not the only person who has. I've not come across a 'standard' solution. I wrote the code I showed in September 2001 and last updated it in March 2007. It was merely copy'n'paste, omitting the test code and version control information. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 11 '11 at 14:40

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