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in detail: if we use public API for example, write java program for example , in JDK 1.4, if should run correctly in all version above it. in all update version in 1.4, in 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7?

Also , what is the combability rule between different updater versions , for example 1.6.22 and 1.6.23 what can not be changed, what can be changed? of course, public API definition can not be changed, how about others? javadoc? internal API definition, implementation?

It will be great if someone can point a concrete official document on this topic. thanks,

there is one example in java document bug, that they intended not to change between updater version. see http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6475885

this should be one of its big picture, but we better to have a complete description on this.

need to know the complete story so that we feel safe to upgrade to bigger version.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not a full answer but I will add that will-it-run and will-it-compile are two different things. Keywords introduced in 1.5 will prevent some 1.4 code from compiling but the byte code will run just fine.

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So you mean that some java code write in 1.4 can not compile in 1.5. But they compiled bytecode can run in 1.5 jre? It will be great if there is some example of this. thanks –  Ben Xu Sep 10 '11 at 3:53
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@Ben Xu, Create a variable or field with the name enum. This will compile on Java 1.4 and run on Java 5.0, but won't compile in Java 5.0. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 10 '11 at 7:23
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@BenXu - I don't mean to be churlish, but this Answer doesn't answer any of the questions that you actually asked. You asked about API compatibility, and this question doesn't mention APIs at all. When you accept an answer, you are telling other people who find your question that you think that this is the best answer to the question they are reading ... not to the one in your head that you never asked. –  Stephen C Dec 6 '11 at 2:12
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The general rule is that any code that is written and compiled against the APIs of Java X should run on Java Y where Y >= X.

There are occasional exceptions to this; e.g. where the application's behaviour depends on some undocumented behaviour (typically a bug) in Java X that was corrected in a later version.

AFAIK, there is no single document that lists these incompatibilities. The release notes for all of the Java major releases include a list of changes that could result in breakage of older code.

Having said that, the prudent approach is make sure that you thoroughly test / retest your software when you upgrade to a more recent Java release. And if your software is shipped to customers / clients, let them know if / when it is safe for them to upgrade, and (if necessary) provide them with fixes for any problems that your testing has uncovered.


need to know the complete story so that we feel safe to upgrade to bigger version.

Feeling safe is beside the point. Thoroughly test your application on the later version. That is the only practical solution. And that would be the case even if each and every incompatibility was exhaustively documented.

Think about it. How can you know for sure that your application won't somehow be affected by change XYZ? Or that some 3rd-party library that you use won't be affected? Answer: you can't.

No manner of complaining here that you think that Oracle should handle this issue differently is going to make any difference. Not that I think that they could handle this better without changing their business model. How much would you be prepared to pay for a Java platform that guaranteed there were no version compatibility issues?

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There should be some more general rule. else , else upgrading a huge software will need a lot of effort, especially if there is no ART. (let's exclude the unfounded bugs introduced by new version, since every software can have bugs, also java itself) –  Ben Xu Sep 10 '11 at 3:58
    
There is possiblity that a bug in Java X is fixed in a later version. But in the software , it makes a workaround with the bug. But with a later Java fixed it, it makes the workaround itself a bug. –  Clark Bao Sep 10 '11 at 4:10
    
@Ben Xu - you are being unrealistic. The only cases where a new Java version deliberately breaks backwards compatibility are when there is no real choice. –  Stephen C Sep 10 '11 at 5:30
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@Ben Xu, Sun/Oracle hasn't provided free support for Java 1.4 or Java 5.0 for some time. If you pay for business support, they are likely to assist you in an compatibility question you might have. (but don't expect every thing to be free ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 10 '11 at 7:22
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Almost anything can be changed between versions there are no set rules for such things. Use the release notes to publish changes or review them between versions such as:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/jdk7-relnotes-418459.html

Usually only bug fixes are the cause of minor versions (like you detail 1.6.22 - 1.6.23), or simple enhancements which are only ever good things. When the major version numbers change then you can expect more major changes but you still "hope" for reverse compatibility.

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I don't think JDK ever changes an API that breaks backward comparability (except unintentionally).

They introduced @deprecated tag in the very beginning, probably thinking that they may need to do some API cleanup in future. But that never happens. No @deprecated API has ever been removed, or behavior changed.

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if we use public API for example, write java program for example , in JDK 1.4, if should run correctly in all version above it. in all update version in 1.4, in 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7?

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add comment

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