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I am trying to locate the point of rotation in a sorted array through a modified binary search.

Consider this array int values[9]={7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}; The point of rotation here is at index = 3 i.e at 9.

I wrote this function for the above operation.

void FindRotationPoint(int values[], int numvalues)
{
    int first =0;
    int last = numvalues-1;
    int middle;
    bool moreTosearch= (first<=last);
    while(first<=last)
    {
        middle = (first+last)/2;
        if(values[0]>values[middle]) //Keep looking right if the middle value in array is greater than first
        {
            last = middle-1;
        }
        if (values[0]<values[middle]) //Keep looking left if the middle value in array is less than first
        {
            first = middle+1;
        }
    }
    cout<<middle+1<<endl;
    cout<<values[middle];
}

If the elements are int values[9]={7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}; Output: 4, 1 (Wrong)

int values[9]={7, 8, 9, 10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}; Output: 4, 10 (Correct)

The point of rotation which is at an even place is found correct whereas in the other case, it finds the succeeding element. What am I missing in the above code?

share|improve this question
    
Since moreTosearch is always just (fist<=last), perhaps you should remove it and put first<=last in while condition. It would make things both more compact and easier to read. –  quasiverse Sep 10 '11 at 4:42
    
Also, this may not work if there are duplicate elements. –  quasiverse Sep 10 '11 at 4:43
3  
9 is at index 2, not 3. –  ildjarn Sep 10 '11 at 4:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This works:

void FindRotationPoint(int values[], int numvalues)
{
    int first =0;
    int last = numvalues-1;
    int middle=0;
    bool moreTosearch= (first<=last);
    while(first<last)
    {
        middle = (first+last)/2;
        if(values[first]>=values[middle]) //Keep looking right if the middle value in array is greater than first
        {
            last = middle;
            cout<<"first>middle: "<<first<<" "<<middle<<" "<<last<<"\n";
        }
        else if (values[middle]>=values[last]) //Keep looking left if the middle value in array is less than first
        {
            first = middle;
            cout<<"middle<last: "<<first<<" "<<middle<<" "<<last<<"\n";
        }
    }
    cout<<middle+1<<endl;
    cout<<values[middle];
}

int main()
{
int values[9]={7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};

FindRotationPoint(values, 9);
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
does it work for an array containing only one element? –  Raj Sep 13 '12 at 8:17
    
You could have tried and asked if it did not work for you. –  A. K. Sep 13 '12 at 13:24
    
The code have a bug. Its not working for {1, 2, 3, 4}; and also for {1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1}; –  Devesh Agrawal Apr 26 at 16:44
    
It's been a while, I do not remember what I did anymore. Please edit the program if you have a fix. Thanks for pointing out the bug though! –  A. K. Apr 28 at 11:19
void FindRotationPoint(int values[], int numvalues)
{
    int first =0;
    int last = numvalues-1;
    int middle;
    bool moreTosearch= (first<=last);
    while(moreTosearch)
    {
        middle = (first+last)/2;
        if(middle == first) break;
        if(values[0]>values[middle]) //Keep looking right if the middle value in array is greater than first
        {
            last = middle;
            moreTosearch= (first<=last);
        }
        if (values[0]<values[middle]) //Keep looking left if the middle value in array is less than first
        {
            first = middle;
            moreTosearch= (first<=last);
        }
    }
}

This should work .

share|improve this answer
    
Using this array at input 'int values[9]={7, 8, 9, 10, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};' Output comes to be 3, 9 which is not the correct answer. –  Cipher Sep 10 '11 at 5:41
    
check again :: 3,9 is for case 1 and 4,10 is for case 2 . Its working !! –  Anil Shanbhag Sep 10 '11 at 7:12
    
Umm...yeah! It is working. I didn't notice other changes. Could you please explain why last=middle, first=middle and if (middle=first) break; were done? –  Cipher Sep 10 '11 at 7:29
    
I suggest you look up binary search , in brief -- binary search reduces range by 2 ie: (first,last) -> (first,middle) or (middle,last) , if suppose you get x,x+1 as first , last this would end up in infinite loop and hence the break condition –  Anil Shanbhag Sep 10 '11 at 7:37
    
This code have a bug. Not working for {1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1}; –  Devesh Agrawal Apr 26 at 16:55

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