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$(document).ready ( 

    function ready() {
        var tester = $.ajax({
                async: false,
                url: "test_parse.php"
            }).responseText;
        document.getElementById('test').innerHTML = tester;
        setTimeout(ready(), 3000); 
   }

);

Hey guys I want to call a function within itself like this but every time I do this my browser just keeps loading and eventually Apache shuts down (obviously not my expected result). Think you guys could help me figure out a solution? Thank you!

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Can you call setTimeout from outside the function? –  Devin Crossman Sep 10 '11 at 4:48
    
also I don't think it's correct to put functions inside $(document).ready({}); –  Devin Crossman Sep 10 '11 at 4:50
1  
@Devin - document.ready expects a function expression as a parameter; it doesn't matter whether said function has a name. (Before anyone points it out, I know that a function expression is not the only option, but I think it is the most commonly used option.) –  nnnnnn Sep 10 '11 at 5:26
1  
Keep in mind that named function expressions have many quirks and issues associated with them (including browser bugs and even memory leaks), so I'd avoid using them in production code. –  josh3736 Sep 10 '11 at 5:59
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5 Answers 5

setTimeout takes a function reference:

setTimeout(ready, 3000); 

not

setTimeout(ready(), 3000); 

And that being said, I would also do this:

$(document).ready ( 

    function ready() {
        var tester = $.ajax({
                url: "test_parse.php",
                success: function (data) {
                    document.getElementById('test').innerHTML = data;
                    setTimeout(ready, 3000); 
                }
            })
   }

);

Because async: false will lock up the browser until that data returns from the server

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1  
maybe he put async:false there for a legitimate reason? –  Travis Webb Sep 10 '11 at 4:54
    
@Travis, maybe? can you name a good reason? –  Joe Sep 10 '11 at 4:55
1  
It seems that he wants to make a synchronous request... do you have a problem with this? –  Travis Webb Sep 10 '11 at 4:57
    
@Travis: There is no good reason to make a synchronous XHR request. 8.4% of reported IE9 hangs last month were due to synchronous XHR. It's bad user experience; there's no reason that what the OP is trying to do can't be accomplished in a success callback function. –  josh3736 Sep 10 '11 at 5:04
    
Why would you put function inside $(document).ready() ? Why would you use $(document).ready() instead of $(function) {}; ? –  Piero Sep 10 '13 at 2:34
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This is wrong:

setTimeout(ready(), 3000); 

This is right:

setTimeout(ready, 3000); 

ready() is actually invoking the function. ready is simply a reference to the function, which is what you want.

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Awesome! Thanks. I knew it was something small. –  Vivek Sep 10 '11 at 4:52
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setTimeout expects a function reference as the first parameter, you have a function invocation which is passing the result of calling ready().

This is causing an infinite loop.

You need to pass in "ready", not "ready()"

setTimeout(ready, 3000);

And if you're trying to queue ajax requests that happen in a structured order, you'll want to fire the setTimeout on success after the previous ajax call, not immediately, otherwise you'll have ajax results returning and updating at arbitrary intervals depending on how the server responds to each request.

$.ajax({
    // your ajax settings
}).success(function () {
    // fire off the next one 3 secs after the last one completes
    setTimeout(ready, 3000);
});

This is better than using the async: false setting, which blocks the browser.

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Why are you trying to call the function within itself? Surely all you need to do is move setTimeout outside of the function, then call ready() every 3000ms? What'l do you want your output to be?

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it's perfectly acceptable for a function to call itself. –  Travis Webb Sep 10 '11 at 4:55
    
ready() calls itself (via the success callback) so that things won't get backed if one of the $.ajax calls takes too long. I tend to use this approach instead of setInterval precisely to keep things nicely in sequence and not backed up. –  mu is too short Sep 10 '11 at 4:56
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Looks like a bunch of recursion to me--every 3 seconds. When does it end?

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