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The following will cause infinite recursion on the == operator overload method

    Foo foo1 = null;
    Foo foo2 = new Foo();
    Assert.IsFalse(foo1 == foo2);

    public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
        if (foo1 == null) return foo2 == null;
        return foo1.Equals(foo2);
    }

How do I check for nulls?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Use ReferenceEquals:

Foo foo1 = null;
Foo foo2 = new Foo();
Assert.IsFalse(foo1 == foo2);

public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
    if (object.ReferenceEquals(null, foo1))
        return object.ReferenceEquals(null, foo2);
    return foo1.Equals(foo2);
}
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Cast to object in the overload method:

public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
    if ((object) foo1 == null) return (object) foo2 == null;
    return foo1.Equals(foo2);
}
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Exactly. Both (object)foo1 == null or foo1 == (object)null will go to the built-in overload ==(object, object) and not to the user-defined overload ==(Foo, Foo). It is just like overload resolution on methods. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 4 '14 at 11:47

Use ReferenceEquals. From the MSDN forums:

public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
    if (ReferenceEquals(foo1, null)) return ReferenceEquals(foo2, null);
    if (ReferenceEquals(foo2, null)) return false;
    return foo1.field1 == foo2.field2;
}
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When I want the operator == and Foo.Equals(object obj) to return the same answer, I usually implement the != operator like this:

public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
  return object.Equals(foo1, foo2);
}
public static bool operator !=(Foo foo1, Foo foo2) {
  return !object.Equals(foo1, foo2);
}

The operator == will then after doing all the null checks for me end up calling foo1.Equals(foo2) where I do the actually checking is the two are equal.

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Try Object.ReferenceEquals(foo1, null)

Anyway, I wouldn't recommend overloading the ==operator; it should be used for comparing references, and use Equals for "semantic" comparisons.

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My approach is to do

(object)item == null

upon which I'm relying on object's own equality operator which can't go wrong. Or a custom extension method (and an overload):

public static bool IsNull<T>(this T obj) where T : class
{
    return (object)obj == null;
}

public static bool IsNull<T>(this T? obj) where T : struct
{
    return !obj.HasValue;
}

or to handle more cases, may be:

public static bool IsNull<T>(this T obj) where T : class
{
    return (object)obj == null || obj == DBNull.Value;
}

The constraint prevents IsNull on value types. Now its as sweet as calling

object obj = new object();
Guid? guid = null; 
bool b = obj.IsNull(); // false
b = guid.IsNull(); // true
2.IsNull(); // error

which means I have one consistent/not-error-prone style of checking for nulls throughout. I also have found (object)item == null is very very very slightly faster than Object.ReferenceEquals(item, null), but only if it matters (I'm currently working on something where I've to micro-optimize everything!).

To see a complete guide on implementing equality checks, see What is "Best Practice" For Comparing Two Instances of a Reference Type?

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You can try to use an object property and catch the resulting NullReferenceException. If the property you try is inherited or overridden from Object, then this works for any class.

public static bool operator ==(Foo foo1, Foo foo2)
{
    //  check if the left parameter is null
    bool LeftNull = false;
    try { Type temp = a_left.GetType(); }
    catch { LeftNull = true; }

    //  check if the right parameter is null
    bool RightNull = false;
    try { Type temp = a_right.GetType(); }
    catch { RightNull = true; }

    //  null checking results
    if (LeftNull && RightNull) return true;
    else if (LeftNull || RightNull) return false;
    else return foo1.field1 == foo2.field2;
}
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If you have many null objects then exception handling may be a big overhead. –  Kasprzol Sep 16 '08 at 20:34
2  
Haha, I agree that this is not the best method. After posting this method, I immediately revised my current project to use ReferenceEquals instead. However, despite being suboptimal it does work, and thus is a valid answer to the question. –  The Digital Gabeg Sep 19 '08 at 1:26

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