Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I often find myself doing quick checks like this:

if (!eregi('.php', $fileName)) {
    $filename .= '.php';
}

But as eregi() was deprecated in PHP 5.3 the code now throws errors.

Is there another function that behaves exactly the same way as eregi()? I don't know anything about regexps and don't want to learn, so preg_match() etc won't work for me.

share|improve this question
1  
I hope you realize that eregi() IS a regular expression function. POSIX-style. preg_match() is a regular expression function, Perl-style. –  sirlancelot Apr 10 '09 at 17:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 22 down vote accepted

stristr achieves exactly the same result as eregi (at least when you don't use regular expressions):

if (!stristr($fileName, '.php'))
    $filename.='.php';

You could also make a "fake" eregi this way:

if (!function_exists('eregi')) {
    function eregi($find, $str) {
        return stristr($str, $find);
    }
}

Update: Note that stristr doesn't accept regular expressions as eregi does, and for this specific case (checking the extension), you'd better go with vartec's solution.

share|improve this answer
    
just to be fussy: stristr is case-insensitive, if you need the case-sensitive ay use strstr –  Strae Apr 10 '09 at 10:29
1  
Well, eregi is case-insensitive, too :) –  moff Apr 10 '09 at 11:40
    
What if $fileName has php in the name but it's not the extension? "example.php.txt" stristr will not work for this. –  sirlancelot Apr 10 '09 at 17:21
    
You should note that eregi uses regular expressions and not just plain text. –  Gumbo Apr 10 '09 at 17:30
    
@sirlancelot: You're right, but this question was about finding a replacement for eregi (which behaves in the same way as stristr when not using regular expressions), and not to check the file extension of a file :) –  moff Apr 10 '09 at 17:32

Of course you are aware, that this doesn't do what you expect it do do? In regexp '.' means any character, so eregi('.php',$fileName) means filename with any character followed by 'php'. Thus for example "blabla2PHP.txt" will match your regexp.

Now what you want to do is this:

$file_ext = pathinfo($filename, PATHINFO_EXTENSION);
if(strtolower($file_ext) != 'php') 
   $filename .= '.php';
share|improve this answer
    
Good point, but this wasn't my question. i used the filename just as an example, what i really want is an alternative function to eregi() which returns true if a String a is found in string b, false otherwise –  Click Upvote Apr 11 '09 at 9:57

Good alternative for eregi() is preg_match() with i modifier:

if (! preg_match('/.php/i',$fileName))
      $filename.='.php';
share|improve this answer

Try this, I'm using this quite a lot since I updated to PHP 5 recently.

Previously:

if(eregi('-', $_GET['id'])
{
   return true;
}

Now I'm using this - it works just as good.

if(preg_match('/(.+)-(.+)/', $_GET['id'])) {
{
   return true;
}

Just replace your code with the following, and you shouldn't have any hitch of difference within your code. If you're wondering why PHP remove eregi() it's because of the performance issues it has when used a lot, so it's better to use preg_match() as it's more specific in searching so it has better performance and rendering times.

Let me know how this works for you.

share|improve this answer

If you go for the "fake" eregi, you shold trigger a notice inside the fake function: trigger_error('Some code still use eregi',E_USER_NOTICE); This way you will easily catch the forgotten eregi calls and can replace them.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps you should consider refactoring your code to do this instead:

if (substr($fileName, -4, 4) !== '.php')
    $fileName .= '.php';

As stated in other answers to this question, eregi('.php') will search for anything followed by 'php' ANYWERE in the file (not just at the end).

share|improve this answer

I generally create and endsWith function; or other simple string manipulation functions for this kind of stuff.

function endsWith($string, $end){
    return substr($string, -strlen($end)) == $end;
}
share|improve this answer

if (! stristr($fileName, '.php')) $filename.='.php';

moff's answser had the parameters backwards.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.stristr.php

share|improve this answer
    
seems right to me - haystack first, then needle. –  Dan Davies Brackett Jan 26 '12 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.