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I'd like to read a binary file with a few 32 bit float values at byte offset 31.

Unfortunately, new Float32Array(buffer, 31, 6); does not work. An offset of 32 instead of 31 works but I need 31.

According to this page, offset has to be a multiple of the element size, 4 in this case.

I'm interested in the reason behind this behaviour. Why does it matter where the view starts?

The best workaround I found thus far has not made it into gecko yet so I can't use it.

Do I realy have to cut and copy the byte values into a new array to get my float values?

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I suspect it's just a matter of expecting multi-byte values to be properly aligned in memory. edit - having the proposed ".slice()" method on ArrayBuffer would be one good workaround, because that'd let you copy odd-aligned bytes into a new well-aligned buffer. –  Pointy Sep 10 '11 at 14:06
    
@Pointy I've extended ArrayBuffer with a subarray function: ArrayBuffer.prototype.subarray = function(offset, length){ var sub = new ArrayBuffer(length); var subView = new Int8Array(sub); var thisView = new Int8Array(this); for(var i = 0; i < length; i++ ){ subView[i] = thisView[offset+i]; } return sub; } –  Markus Sep 10 '11 at 14:16
    
OK yes that's probably what ".slice()" would do too :-) It seems like an awkward set of APIs to work with; I have only recently started reading about it all. –  Pointy Sep 10 '11 at 14:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm interested in the reason behind this behaviour. Why does it matter where the view starts?

Some architectures do not allow unaligned word accesses, and there are performance penalties on architectures that do allow it such as x86 (though some instructions must be aligned).

Do I really have to cut and copy the byte values into a new array to get my float values?

Yes, just like Markus' example you should create a new ArrayBuffer with a UInt8Array view and a Float32Array view for a read_buffer (copy with UInt8Array view and interpret from Float32Array view). Then you can read from your data with a UInt8Array, copy that into your read_buffer view and then interpret using the Float32Array. It's quite a seamless process.

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Actually, I(Markus) am to one who asked this question, pimvdb just made some modifications. –  Markus Dec 26 '11 at 21:58
1  
Let's make some modifications here as well :) –  pimvdb Dec 26 '11 at 23:02

DataView.getFloat32() would be the best way to do this. DataView is designed for packed data and allows unaligned access to the data in an ArrayBuffer so you can pass in odd offsets like 31.

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DataView, which I've linked to in my question, did not work back then. I have switched to it since it has been implemented. –  Markus Apr 17 '13 at 8:17
    
Also, this will only get 1 number instead of getting a list of numbers. –  Charles L. Jan 26 at 19:15

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