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I have the ViewValue class defined as follows:

class ViewValue {

private Long id;
private Integer value;
private String description;
private View view;
private Double defaultFeeRate;

// getters and setters for all properties
}

Somewhere in my code i need to convert a list of ViewValue instances to a list containing values of id fields from corresponding ViewValue.

I do it using foreach loop:

List<Long> toIdsList(List<ViewValue> viewValues) {

   List<Long> ids = new ArrayList<Long>();

   for (ViewValue viewValue : viewValues) {
      ids.add(viewValue.getId());
   }

   return ids;

}

Is there a better approach to this problem?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

EDIT: This answer is based on the idea that you'll need to do similar things for different entities and different properties elsewhere in your code. If you only need to convert the list of ViewValues to a list of Longs by ID, then stick with your original code. If you want a more reusable solution, however, read on...

I would declare an interface for the projection, e.g.

public interface Function<Arg,Result>
{
    public Result apply(Arg arg);
}

Then you can write a single generic conversion method:

public <Source, Result> List<Result> convertAll(List<Source> source,
    Function<Source, Result> projection)
{
    ArrayList<Result> results = new ArrayList<Result>();
    for (Source element : source)
    {
         results.add(projection.apply(element));
    }
    return results;
}

Then you can define simple projections like this:

private static final Function<ViewValue, Long> ID_PROJECTION =
    new Function<ViewValue, Long>()
    {
        public Long apply(ViewValue x)
        {
            return x.getId();
        }
    };

And apply it just like this:

List<Long> ids = convertAll(values, ID_PROJECTION);

(Obviously using K&R bracing and longer lines makes the projection declaration a bit shorter :)

Frankly all of this would be a lot nicer with lambda expressions, but never mind...

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1  
Very Javaesque solution - but not in a good way. It doesnt exactly reduce the amount or complexity of the code, does it? –  Michael Borgwardt Apr 10 '09 at 10:35
    
I'd say it's more LINQ-esque than Java-esque personally. I'd rather create the conversion code and then isolate the projection aspect, but if you'd rather duplicate the conversion logic loads of times, that's fine. It would be a lot nicer with lambda expressions, of course. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '09 at 10:44
    
Does it not something like we do with Comparator in Java? –  Adeel Ansari Apr 10 '09 at 10:47
    
Not really - that only converts to int from what I remember. However, I approached this with the idea of reuse which may not be required - editing my answer to reflect this. –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '09 at 10:49
    
(Note that my "loads of times" comment was assuming this would be required for different properties etc as well, rather than just the one.) –  Jon Skeet Apr 10 '09 at 11:06

You could do it in a one-liner using Commons BeanUtils and Collections:
(why write your own code when others have done it for you?)

import org.apache.commons.beanutils.BeanToPropertyValueTransformer;
import org.apache.commons.collections.CollectionUtils;

...

List<Long> ids = (List<Long>) CollectionUtils.collect(viewValues, 
                                       new BeanToPropertyValueTransformer("id"));
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1  
+1 for the comment "why write your own code when others have done it for you?" This is an issue we face on a daily basis - having to create a solution to a problem that has already been solved. –  divesh premdeep Aug 7 '12 at 7:02
    
PropertyUtils.getProperty(object, propertyName); uses reflection under the hood which would have an extra performance cost. For that I would use instead Jon Skeet's approach. –  Juan Carlos Blanco Martínez Oct 16 '13 at 11:52

Use google collections. Example:

    Function<ViewValue, Long> transform = new Function<ViewValue, Long>() {
        @Override
        public Long apply(ViewValue from) {
            return from.getId();
        }
    };
    List<ViewValue> list = Lists.newArrayList();
    List<Long> idsList = Lists.transform(list, transform);

UPDATE:

On Java 8 you don't need Guava. You can:

import com.example.ViewValue;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.function.Function;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

Function<ViewValue, Long> transform = ViewValue::getId;
List<ViewValue> source = new ArrayList<>();
List<Long> result = source.stream().map(transform).collect(Collectors.toList());

Or just:

List<ViewValue> source= new ArrayList<>();
List<Long> result = source.stream().map(ViewValue::getId).collect(Collectors.toList());
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You could ude a wrapper:

public class IdList impements List<Long>
{
    private List<ViewValue> underlying;

    pubic IdList(List<ViewValue> underying)
    {
        this.underlying = underying;
    }

    public Long get(int index)
    {
        return underlying.get(index).getId()
    }

    // other List methods
}

though thats even more tedious work, it could improve performance.

You could also implement your and my solution genericaly using reflection, but that woud be very bad for perforance.

Theres no short and easy generic solution in Java, Im afraid. In Groovy, you would simply use collect(), but I believe that involves reflection as well.

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I've implemented a small functional library for this usecase. One of the methods has this signature:

<T> List<T> mapToProperty(List<?> objectList, String property, Class<T> returnType)

Which takes the string and uses reflection to create a call to the property then it returns a List backed by the objectList where get and iterator implemented using this property call.

The mapToProperty functions is implemented in terms of a general map function that takes a Function as a mapper though, just as another post described. Very usefull.

I suggest you read up on basic functionl programming and in particular take a look at Functors (objects implementing a map function)

Edit: Reflection really doesn't have to be expensive. The JVM has improved a lot in this area. Just make sure to compile the invocation once and reuse it.

Edit2: Sample code

public class MapExample {
    public static interface Function<A,R>
    {
    	public R apply(A b);
    }

    public static <A,R> Function<A,R> compilePropertyMapper(Class<A> objectType, String property, Class<R> propertyType)
    {
    	try {
    		final Method m = objectType.getMethod("get" + property.substring(0,1).toUpperCase() + property.substring(1));

    		if(!propertyType.isAssignableFrom(m.getReturnType()))
    			throw new IllegalArgumentException(
    				"Property "+property+" on class "+objectType.getSimpleName()+" is not a "+propertyType.getSimpleName()
    			);

    		return new Function<A,R>() 
    		{
    			@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    			public R apply(A b)
    			{
    				try {
    					return (R)m.invoke(b);
    				} catch (Exception e) {
    					throw new RuntimeException(e);
    				}
    			};
    		};

    	} catch (Exception e) {
    		throw new RuntimeException(e);
    	}
    }

    public static <T1,T2> List<T2> map(final List<T1> list, final Function<T1,T2> mapper)
    {
    	return new AbstractList<T2>()
    	{
    		@Override
    		public T2 get(int index) {
    			return mapper.apply(list.get(index));
    		}

    		@Override
    		public int size() {
    			return list.size();
    		}
    	};
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T1,T2> List<T2> mapToProperty(List<T1> list, String property, Class<T2> propertyType)
    {
    	if(list == null)
    		return null;
    	else if(list.isEmpty())
    		return Collections.emptyList();

    	return map(list,compilePropertyMapper((Class<T1>)list.get(0).getClass(), property, propertyType));
    }
}
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That depends on what you then do with the List<Long>, and the List<ViewValue>

For example you might get sufficient functionality from creating your own List implementation that wraps a List<ViewValue>, implementing iterator() with an iterator implementation that iterates over the ViewValues, returning the id.

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