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I have 2 tables in MySql

Table_A { pk_A VARCHAR 150 PRIMARY KEY, random_data } ~ 9500 rows
Table_B { pk_B VARCHAR 150, more_random_data } ~ 50000 rows

Relationship between them is one-to-many, pk_A will be found multiple times in Table_B on col pk_B.

My problem is:

  • if i enable indexing on pk_B , php/mysql CRUD works fine, but a JOIN or anyother query from command line involving both tables takes a long time

  • if i disable indexing on pk_B, php/mysql CRUD becomes laggish, but a JOIN or anyother query from command line involving both tables is instantaneous

How can i improve my database performance (i could modify my pk's from varchar to int(11)) but i wondered if there are other workarounds available

Thanks

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1  
Why you using varchar as primary key? –  Book Of Zeus Sep 10 '11 at 16:37
    
How are you joining the tables? The PKs should always be indexed, and foreign key columns should also be indexed for faster joins. –  bfavaretto Sep 10 '11 at 16:41
    
What's the engine being used. There are different performance considerations between MyISAM and InnoDB. –  IfLoop Sep 10 '11 at 16:45
    
@Book of Zeus : i didn't design the database, i migrated it from mdb to sql, what you're trying to say is to replace varchar with int –  cristi _b Sep 10 '11 at 16:53
1  
@cristi _b: Yes, absolutely. Integer are faster, they take up less space, and more importantly they are much quicker to compare. –  Book Of Zeus Sep 10 '11 at 16:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A few things to speed up your queries. As the many comments suggest; you always want to keep your primary keys as small as is reasonable. A short string, say VARCHAR(10) won't cause you much pain, but much larger than that, you may want to use a surrogate key. This can be made more or less transparent by making the natural key be unique, but not in the primary key.

Table_A { pk_A VARCHAR 150 PRIMARY KEY, random_data } ~ 9500 rows Table_B { pk_B VARCHAR 150, more_random_data } ~ 50000 rows

Your schema should probably look a bit like this:

CREATE TABLE `Table_A` (
    `id` INTEGER AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    `A_name` VARCHAR(150) UNIQUE NOT NULL,
    -- other columns
) ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE `Table_B` (
    `id` INTEGER AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    `B_name` VARCHAR(150) UNIQUE NOT NULL,
    `A_id` INTEGER REFERENCES `Table_A`(`id`),
    -- other columns
) ENGINE = InnoDB;
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solution worked, just tested query times and it's awesome! –  cristi _b Sep 10 '11 at 18:19

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