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I have the code like this :

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
int c;
c = getchar();
while (c != EOF) {
putchar(c);
c = getchar();
}
}

The C documentation says that the getchar() returns the int value. And in the above program we have assigned c type as an int. And most importantly EOF is a integer constant defined in the header function.

Now if the code changes to something like this:

 #include <stdio.h>
    main()
    {
    char c;
    c = getchar();
    while (c != EOF) {
    putchar(c);
    c = getchar();
    }
    }

This code also works! Wait a min, as per C documentation getchar() returnsint, but see in the above code I'm storing it in char. And C compiler doesn't throw any error. And also in while loop I have compared c which is an char with EOF which is an int and compiler doesn't throw any error and my program executes!

Why does the compiler doesn't throw any error in the above two cases?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
C isn't dynamic, it just allows implicit casts between numeric types. The second code will interpret the character \xFF as EOF (on systems where EOF == -1), but the first won't, which is why getchar uses int. –  ughoavgfhw Sep 10 '11 at 17:49
1  
Why a downvote? –  Ant's Sep 10 '11 at 17:51
1  
@ughoavgfhw I doesn't have to be \xFF, plus on machines where char is unsigned, it may be compiled as an infinite loop. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 10 '11 at 17:51
1  
@Ant's I didn't downvote, but the question is a bit silly. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 10 '11 at 17:54
4  
Seems like a valid, well asked newbie question. It should be UPVOTED not downvoted. –  Doug T. Sep 10 '11 at 17:56
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No. It simply means that the returned value which is an int, implicitly converts into char type. That is all.

The compiler may generate warning messages for such conversion, as sizeof(int) is greater than sizeof(char). For example, if you compile your code with -Wconversion option with GCC, it gives these warning messages:

c.c:5:7: warning: conversion to 'char' from 'int' may alter its value
c.c:8:8: warning: conversion to 'char' from 'int' may alter its value

That means, you should use int to avoid such warning messages.

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so which is best way to use? a char or an int? –  Ant's Sep 10 '11 at 17:48
    
Which also means that the code won't work. It may seem to work, but you can easily input the correct value to make it end prematurely, or if you are on an architecture, where char is unsigned, it will never exit the loop. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 10 '11 at 17:49
1  
@Ant's: I updated my answer. –  Nawaz Sep 10 '11 at 17:53
add comment

I'm afraid that the term "dynamic programming language" is too vaguely defined to make a such a fine distinction in this case.

Though I'd argue that implicit converting to one numeric type to another is not a dynamic language feature, but just syntax sugar.

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No. Lets look at wikipedia's definition

These behaviors could include extension of the program, by adding new code, by extending objects and definitions, or by modifying the type system, all during program execution. These behaviors can be emulated in nearly any language of sufficient complexity, but dynamic languages provide direct tools to make use of them.

What you have demonstrated is that a char and int in C/C++ are pretty much the same, and C/C++ automatically casts between the two. Nothing more. There's no modification of the type system here.

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Lets rewrite your code to illustrate what's going on

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    char c;
    c = EOF; /* supposing getchar() returns eof */
    return (c == EOF) ? 0 : 1;
}

What should the return value of this program be? EOF is not a char, but you cast it to a char. When you do a comparison, that cast happens again, and it gets squashed to the same value. Another way of rewriting this to make it clear what's going on is:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    int c;
    c = getchar();
    while ((char)c != (char)EOF) {
        putchar((char)c);
        c = getchar();
    }
}

EOF is getting squashed; it doesn't matter how it's getting squashed, it could be squashed to the letter 'M', but since it gets squashed the same way every time, you still see it as EOF.

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C will let you do what you want, but you have to accept the consequences. If you want to assign an int to a char then you can. Doesn't make it a dynamic language.

(As an aside, the title of this question should be something like "why does c let me assign an int to a char?" and just contain the final paragraph. But presumably that wouldn't attract enough attention. If it had attracted any upvotes then I'd edit the title, but since it isn't I'll leave it as an example of how not to ask a question.)

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Lol! sorry it was a newbie question and ya sure @andy I wont keep the titles as such hereafter! –  Ant's Sep 10 '11 at 17:59
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If you are not reading 7-bit ASCII data, it is possible that \xFF is valid data. If EOF is \xFFFFFFFF and you return the value of getchar() to a char then you can not distinguish EOF from \xFF as data.

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