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Here are two examples:

public class A {
    public void foo(A a) {
        System.out.println("in A");
    }
}


public class B extends A {      
    public void foo(B b) { // (1)
        System.out.println("in B");
    }
    public void f(Object o) { // (2)
        System.out.println("in B");
    }
}

I don't understand how come (1) and (2) are considered to be an overrided method for A's foo(). method number 1 accepts a lower class than the original foo(), I mean that I can't send her any class of A. as I see it, (1) does not extend foo(), but it is still counts as an override- why?( Similar argument for (2), but opposite).

The reason that I made me think that it is overrided is this:

when I'm trying to run

  B b = new B();

  b.foo(b);

It checks if A has a foo that accepts B. since every B is an A, it does have one so it ought to print "in A" and not "in B" because B does not overrides it. but it prints "in B"..

share|improve this question
    
See my response? Why do you think they override the super method? –  Miserable Variable Sep 10 '11 at 19:00
    
Try this: B b = new B(); A a = b; a.f(b); –  Miserable Variable Sep 10 '11 at 19:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Neither of them override the super class A'a method.

class A {
  public void foo(A a) {
    System.out.println("in A");
  }
}


class B extends A {

  @Override
  public void foo(B b) {
    System.out.println("in B");
  }
  @Override
  public void foo(Object o) {
    System.out.println("in B");
  }
}

When I compile the above I get errors:

$ javac -g O.java 
O.java:10: method does not override or implement a method from a supertype
  @Override
  ^
O.java:14: method does not override or implement a method from a supertype
  @Override
  ^
2 errors

But note that it is ok to return a subclass from an overriding method. The following compiles without error.

class A {
  public A foo() {
    System.out.println("in A");
    return this;
  }
}

class B extends A {
  @Override
  public B foo() {
    System.out.println("in B");
    return this;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi! I add my explanation to the question. –  Numerator Sep 10 '11 at 19:08
    
I still don't understand why it has the right to approach to B's foo if it does not overrides As. We start from the super class and search if it was overrided, and if so, we use the overrided one, no? –  Numerator Sep 10 '11 at 19:14
    
No :) You need to read up some more on how method resolution works. Consider b.foo(b) above. The compiler checks to see if B (the declared type of variable b) has a method named foo that takes a parameter of type B. It finds one, so calls it. It is not virtual dispatch at work here. –  Miserable Variable Sep 10 '11 at 19:20
    
Ok, every time that I think that I catch it, there's an example that makes it wrong :) who uses these things in the real world, anyway? Thank you! –  Numerator Sep 10 '11 at 19:24
    
Everyone uses these things. Best of luck for your further studies. –  Miserable Variable Sep 10 '11 at 19:25

For overriding to work, method signatures should be the same. In this case, they aren't because they differ in the arguments they take. They are just member functions with 1,2 being overloads. ( Considering 2 as a typo. It should be foo instead of f )

share|improve this answer

Neither 1) nor 2) override anything, as you can verify that by adding the @Override annotation:

public class B extends A {

    @Override
    public void foo(B b) {
        System.out.println("in B");
    }

    @Override
    public void f(Object o) {
        System.out.println("in B");
    }
}

Neither method will compile, since it doesn't override anything.

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