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UPDATED: I've updated the code based on the correct answer below. This works but creates a new problem (I will post a new question).

Creating a blocking bounded buffer class using semaphore's with multiple producers and consumers.

Goal is to use atomic integer as the pointers so I don't have to synchronize internally. Overflow handling has been corrected to use CAS now.

But this doesn't work unless I use synchronized around the AtomicInteger pointers (see comment below). Not sure why? Scroll all the way below to see what I mean by "missing entries"...

public class BoundedBuffer<T> {
private static final int BUFFER_SIZE = Short.MAX_VALUE+1;
private AtomicReferenceArray<T> m_buffer = null;
private Semaphore m_full = new Semaphore(BUFFER_SIZE);
private Semaphore m_empty = new Semaphore(0);
private AtomicInteger m_writePointer = new AtomicInteger();
private AtomicInteger m_readPointer = new AtomicInteger();

public BoundedBuffer() {
    m_buffer = new AtomicReferenceArray<T>(BUFFER_SIZE);
}

public static int safeGetAndIncrement(AtomicInteger i) {
    int oldValue = 0, newValue = 0;
    do {
        oldValue = i.get();
        newValue = (oldValue == Short.MAX_VALUE) ? 0 : (oldValue + 1);
    } while (!i.compareAndSet(oldValue, newValue));
    return oldValue;
}

public void add(T data) throws InterruptedException {
    m_full.acquire();
    synchronized (this) { // << Commenting this doesn't work
        // CAS-based overflow handling
        m_buffer.set(safeGetAndIncrement(m_writePointer),data);
    }
    m_empty.release();
}

public T get() throws InterruptedException {
    T data = null;
    m_empty.acquire();
    synchronized (this) { // << Commenting this doesn't work
        // CAS-based overflow handling
        data = m_buffer.get(safeGetAndIncrement(m_readPointer));
    }
    m_full.release();
    return data;
}
}

Test program has...

8 producer threads, each putting about 10000 entries into the queue. Each entry is a string of the format: A":"B where A is numbers 0..7 for the 8 threads. B is just a numerically increasing count from 0..9999

4 consumer threads, consuming everything, until null is hit.

Once producer threads have completed adding everything into the buffer, 4 null's are added to the queue (to stop the consumers).

Output of the threads...

P:Data, 1:9654@1 P:Data, 5:1097@347 C:Data, 1:9654@1 P:Data, 4:5538@1 C:Data, 4:5538@1 C:Data, null@14466

Verification When verifying if all entries that were produced were consumer, a few appear missing (just before the arrayindexoutofbounds is hit (may just be a coincidence).

Verifying... Missing 4:5537 Missing 5:1096 Verified

share|improve this question
    
"I've seen missing entries" isn't quite enough information for anyone to figure out what you mean. – Jim Garrison Sep 10 '11 at 19:31
    
Missing = consumer doesn't see all entries that the producer puts in. Example output....Start: 0 Start: 2 Start: 1 Start: 3 P:Data, 1:9654@1 P:Data, 5:1097@347 C:Data, 1:9654@1 P:Data, 4:5538@1 C:Data, 4:5538@1 Finish: 0 Finish: 3 Finish: 1 C:Data, null@14466 Finish: 2 Verifying... Missing 4:5537 Missing 5:1096 Verified – TechnoJab Sep 10 '11 at 19:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to handle overflows when incrementing the counter. For example, you can use the following method instead of getAndIncrement():

public static int safeGetAndIncrement(AtomicInteger i) {
    int oldValue = 0;
    do {
        oldValue = i.get();
        int newValue = (oldValue == MAX_VALUE) ? 0 : (oldValue + 1);
    } while (!i.compareAndSet(oldValue, newValue));
    return oldValue;
}

It uses the typical compare-and-swap approach and shouldn't harm performance since getAndIncrement() is internally implemented in the same way.

Also, if MAX_VALUE is BUFFER_SIZE you don't need % BUFFER_SIZE operation.

share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't two threads enter this safeGetAndIncrement method of yours at the same time then get the same oldValue and increment it to get the same newValue? That wouldn't work, would it now? – TechnoJab Sep 10 '11 at 19:47
    
@TechnoJab: That's how compare-and-swap approach works: two threads can enter the block, but only one can successfully execute compareAndSet() (see its javadoc), another one will retry. – axtavt Sep 10 '11 at 21:15
    
Thanks -- okay, that works and I think I understood the CAS overflow handling approach. But I have another problem now (and I've posted a completely new question). – TechnoJab Sep 10 '11 at 23:40

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